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Facts About Antidepressants

A new study says some antidepressants are mostly ineffective, but many previous studies show the opposite.
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WebMD Feature

A controversial new study suggests the widely prescribed antidepressants Prozac, Paxil, and Effexor work no better than placebo for most patients who take them, and many depression experts now cry foul.

What does the new study say about the ineffectiveness of antidepressants?

In findings published in the February issue of the journal PloS Medicine, researchers conclude that when taken as a whole, the data show that only a small group of the most severely depressed patients benefit from taking one of the antidepressants.

For less severely depressed patients, the antidepressants were found to work no better than placebos, leading the researchers to conclude that most patients who take antidepressants probably shouldn't be on them.

Does this study contradict numerous positive studies on antidepressants?

Yes, it does. In a statement, American Psychiatric Association President-elect Nada Stotland, MD, maintains that studies like this one, which compare a single drug to placebo, do not accurately reflect the way doctors prescribe antidepressants today.

Stotland says many people who are depressed do not respond to the first antidepressant they try. "It may take up to an average of three or more different antidepressants until we find the one that works for a particular individual. Therefore, testing any single antidepressant on a group of depressed individuals will show that many of them do not improve."

What do other findings show about using antidepressants?

Numerous studies support the benefit of antidepressants in improving mood, increasing ability to function socially, and easing physical complaints of joint pain, insomnia, and low energy.

According to Ronald R. Fieve, MD, psychopharmacologist and professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City, its not unusual for an antidepressant to take two to six weeks to have an effect on a patient's mood.

"People must realize that we've come a long way in reducing the side effects of antidepressants since first prescribing the tricyclics," Fieve says. "And while drug companies have reduced medication side effects with the newer [antidepressants], there's still not much improvement with onset of action or efficacy."

Fieve notes that in his practice, a good number of patients dramatically come out of their depression within 10 days to two weeks. "About 65% see improvement on the first antidepressant, and 85% of patients succeed on one to three antidepressant trials."

Why wouldn’t an antidepressant work?

According to Fieve, sometimes the doctor chooses the wrong antidepressant, or the right antidepressant in the wrong dosage, or does not administer the antidepressant for at least six weeks at the highest dose tolerable to achieve full therapeutic results.

In addition, if the depressed patient has problems with alcohol or drug abuse and takes an antidepressant, the medication isn't getting at the real problem. There are also patients who are heavily medicated on tranquilizers who wonder why an antidepressant doesn't work to ease their depression. Coming off the tranquilizers may improve mood, Fieve says.

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