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Depression Health Center

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When Hospitalization Is Needed for Depression

Most depression -- over 90% -- is treated on an out-patient basis. But, in cases of severe depression or treatment-resistant depression, some people need to stay in the hospital for a short time. You might seek hospitalization yourself. Or you could be hospitalized under a doctor's order.

There is an unfortunate stigma associated with being hospitalized. Many people feel ashamed, as if it's a sign that they are "crazy" or "weak." Some people fear that being hospitalized is the same thing as being institutionalized or sent to an asylum.

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Depression: When It’s All in the Family

Researchers are becoming increasingly aware that depression runs in families -- sometimes across multiple generations. If Lynne Boschee were to draw her family tree of depression, for instance, it would branch across three generations to include her father and her brother and his two teen-aged children. On one limb would be Boschee herself, who had postpartum depression. Her 4-year-old son, Jack, doesn’t have the illness, but she worries that his excessive fears and panic attacks spell an anxiety...

Read the Depression: When It’s All in the Family article > >

But that's not the case. Usually, a stay in the hospital is just a way for you to recover in a safe and stable environment. This allows you to take a break from some of the daily stresses that contributed to your depression. Your health care providers can work with you to try different treatments and figure out which are best.

Most people don't like being in the hospital. You may not like the routine, the food, or the other patients. It might be frightening. But look at it this way: Depression is an illness, as real and as serious as heart disease or cancer. And sometimes depression -- just like other serious diseases -- requires treatments that can only be provided in a hospital.

Who Needs to Be Hospitalized for Depression?

There are many people with depression who might benefit from a hospital stay. Here are some examples.

  • People who are at risk of hurting themselves or others. Preventing suicide and violence is the most common reason for hospitalization. A stay in the hospital allows you to get back in control.
  • People who are unable to function. Hospitalization makes sense if you are so depressed that you can't take care of yourself.
  • People who need observation when trying a new medication . Sometimes, your doctor may be fine-tuning your depression medicine and advise doing so under the close supervision of the hospital. Since you will be under constant observation there, your doctor will be able to see more easily how well a treatment is working.
  • People who need treatments that are given only in a hospital. Some treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), are usually given in the hospital. A stay in the hospital allows you to recover from anesthesia and gives your doctors a chance to see how you're doing after treatment.
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