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Depression Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Depression

  1. Depression - Medicines

    Antidepressant medicines may improve or completely relieve the symptoms of depression. If you are mildly depressed,you may not have to take them,but most people with moderate or severe depression need medicine. Antidepressant medicines work in different ways. No antidepressant works better than another,but different ones work better or worse for different people. The side effects of ...

  2. Depression - Exams and Tests

    Depression may be diagnosed when you talk to your doctor about feeling sad or when your doctor asks you questions and discovers that you are feeling sad. You may be seeing your doctor because you feel sad or because you have another health problem or concern. If your doctor thinks you are depressed,he or she will ask you questions about your health and feelings. This is called a mental health ...

  3. Depression - Living With Depression

    When you're going through depression,you can't just shake if off. You might have a couple of good days followed by a bad day or a string of bad days. And you don't know how long it will last. Depression is not like the flu or a sprained ankle,where your doctor can tell you about how long it will take to get better. When you're getting better,many experts call it recovery. Recovery is ...

  4. Depression - Therapy

    Counseling and psychotherapy are important parts of treatment for depression. You will work with a mental health professional such as a psychologist,licensed professional counselor,clinical social worker,or psychiatrist. Together,you will develop an action plan to treat your depression. The first step is finding a therapist you trust and feel comfortable with. The therapist also should ...

  5. Depression - When to Call a Doctor

    Call or the national suicide hotline at 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) or other emergency services if you (or someone you care about who has depression ): Plan to harm yourself or others. Talk,write,read,or draw about death,including writing suicide notes and talking about items that can harm you,such as pills,guns,or knives. Buy guns or bullets,stockpile medicines,or take other action ...

  6. Depression - Health Tools

    Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health. Decision Points focus on key medical care decisions that are important to many health problems. Should I stop taking my depression medicine? Should I take antidepressants while I'm pregnant? Should I take medications to treat depression? Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing ...

  7. Depression - Topic Overview

    Is this topic for you? This topic covers depression in adults. For information on: Depression in young people,see the topic Depression in Children and Teens. Depression after childbirth,see the topic Postpartum Depression. Depression followed by times of high energy,see the topic Bipolar Disorder. Depression and suicide,see Depression and suicide. What is depression? Depression is an ...

  8. Depression - What Happens

    Depression is different for everyone. For some people,a bout of depression begins with symptoms of anxiety (such as worrying a lot),sadness,or lack of energy. This may go on for days or months before you or others think you are depressed. And other people may feel depressed suddenly. This may happen after a big change in life,such as the loss of a loved one or a serious accident. It's ...

  9. Depression - Treatment Overview

    Depression can be treated in various ways. Counseling,psychotherapy,and antidepressant medicines may all be used. Lifestyle changes,such as getting more exercise,also may help. Your doctor or mental health professional will help you find the best treatment. For severe depression,a very small number of people may need to stay in a hospital for a short time,especially if they are thinking ...

  10. Depression - What Increases Your Risk?

    Experts don't know why some people get depression and others don't. But certain things make you likely to get depression. These are called risk factors. Important risk factors for depression include: Having a father,mother,brother,or sister who has had depression. Having had depression before. Having post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One-time stressful events,such as the death of a ...

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