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Diabetes Health Center

Features Related to Diabetes

  1. Diabetes Complications: What's Your Risk?

    Heart attack, stroke, blindness, amputation, kidney failure. When doctors describe these diabetes complications, it may sound melodramatic -- like an overblown worst-case scenario. The truth is, these things can happen when blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol are out of control. "A lot of p

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  2. Diabetes and Weight Loss: The Right Path

    Diabetes and weight loss: They're the yin and yang of optimal health. There's no question about it: If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, dropping pounds lowers your blood sugar, improves your health, and helps you feel better. But before you start a weight loss plan, it's important to work

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  3. 7 Healthy Diabetic Desserts for Your Diabetes Diet

    Chocolate mousse pies, parfaits, luscious cakes topped with fruit. If you have diabetes, you'll have to bid farewell to such desserts, right? Wrong, says Lara Rondinelli, RD, CDE, diabetes center coordinator at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. ''At diagnosis, people think that their life's

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  4. Peripheral Neuropathy and Diabetes

    For millions of people with diabetes, living with nerve pain means learning to improvise. Even the best medicines only cut nerve pain by about half, on average. And some people with diabetes might want to avoid the expense and potential side effects of additional prescription drugs. Not surprisingly

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  5. Randy Jackson Tackles Weight Loss, Diet, and Diabetes

    Randy Jackson’s struggle with obesity began as a child in Louisiana, with its super spicy, often super-fatty cuisine. Even as an adult, Jackson still doesn't dream of sugarplums at Christmastime. Instead, he dreams of waltzing andouille sausage and grits, jigging jambalaya, and shimmying beignets an

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  6. Diabetes Care: Managing Your Time When You Have Diabetes

    Sometimes, living with diabetes can seem like a full-time job -- trying to keep up with everything you need to do for proper diabetes care. "Diabetes is a very time-consuming disease to manage well," says Karmeen Kulkarni, MS, RD, CDE, and former president of health care and education for the Americ

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  7. 3 Diabetes Tests You Must Have

    Even before you notice symptoms, high blood sugar can damage parts of your body. That's why certain diabetes tests to check blood sugar control and to catch problems early are so crucial. But many patients aren't getting key diabetes tests at least annually, such as the hemoglobin A1c test, a dilate

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  8. Five Ways to Control Type 2 Diabetes

    About two years ago, when Anne Tierney learned she had type 2 diabetes, it galvanized her. “My diagnosis came as a shock,” says Tierney, who was then about 40 pounds overweight. “I used to eat chocolate all the time. The day I was diagnosed, I quit.” She also consulted a nutritionist and hired a per

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  9. Crocs: Healthy Shoes or Just Comfy?

    Crocs -- those clog-like shoes in bright colors -- might not match everyone's idea of fashion, but fans swear by their comfort. And Croc lovers say they bring health benefits to the two extremities that carry us all to the places we go. Are Crocs really good for our feet? WebMD got some feedback fro

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  10. The Dieter’s (and Diabetic Person's) Guide to Buying Chocolate

    How can you get your daily chocolate fix -- and eat less sugar or calories, too? That's a million-dollar question that several companies are banking on people asking. Over the past few years, the sugar-free and portion-controlled chocolate market has exploded. There are all sorts of sugar-free versi

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Displaying 71 - 80 of 121 Articles << Prev Page 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Next >>

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Normal
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If the level is below 70 or you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

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