Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Diabetes Health Center

Font Size

Diabetes and Your Skin

By Brenda Conaway
WebMD Feature

Diabetes gives you a good reason to pamper your skin. You are more prone to skin problems like dryness. Scarring from insulin shots can affect how your body absorbs insulin. And because diabetes raises your chances of infection, even a minor skin condition can become a more serious problem.

People with diabetes "get everything!" says Kathy Kindelan, RN, a retired nurse who's had diabetes since her 20s. If you develop even a small skin problem, she says, "you have to treat it aggressively."

Recommended Related to Diabetes

Diabetes and Wounds: Caring for Sores

Every 30 seconds, somewhere in the world, someone loses a lower limb as a result of diabetes. That's because diabetes and wounds are a dangerous combination. If you have diabetes, there's no such thing as a minor wound to the foot -- even a small foot sore can turn into an ulcer that, if not properly treated, can lead to amputation. The rate of amputation for people with diabetes is 10 times higher than for those who don't have the disease. Most of these amputations could easily be prevented with...

Read the Diabetes and Wounds: Caring for Sores article > >

There are three main types of diabetes skin conditions, says Margo S. Hudson, MD, an instructor at Harvard Medical School:

  • Skin conditions that happen mostly to people with diabetes
  • Common skin infections made worse by having high blood sugar
  • Skin problems that occur from insulin shots

This guide will fill you in on common skin conditions linked to diabetes and how to prevent or care for them.

Common Skin Conditions With Diabetes

Many diabetes-related skin conditions harmless, but it's helpful to know what they look like and when to see your doctor for treatment.

Diabetic dermopathy. This appears as light brown, scaly, round spots on the shins. They look a lot like age spots but are caused by changes in your small blood vessels. "It's more of a cosmetic issue and doesn’t really require treatment," Hudson says.

Disseminated granuloma annulare. This causes red, red-brown, or skin-colored raised rings or arcs on the skin. They are likely to show up on your fingers, ears, or lower legs, but can also appear on the trunk of your body. Your doctor can prescribe a cortisone skin cream or another treatment.

Digital sclerosis. About one-third of people with type 1 diabetes have this condition. It can make the skin on the back of your hands thick, waxy, and tight. Your finger joints may become stiff and hard to move. You can also get it on your forehead and toes and, rarely, your elbows, knees, or ankles. Get your blood sugar under control to treat it.

Acanthosis nigricans . With this condition, the skin on your neck, armpits, or groin thickens and becomes brown or tan. "People think it's dirt and wonder why they can't clean it off," Hudson says. Insulin resistance causes it, most likely if you are overweight. Treatment includes losing weight and taking diabetes drugs, which help the body use insulin better.

Eruptive xanthomatosis. Young men with type 1 diabetes who also have high levels of cholesterol and fat in their blood often get this condition. It causes raised, yellow, pea-sized bumps that have a red halo and may itch. They appear on the hands, arms, feet, legs, and buttocks. Getting your blood sugar levels under control clears them up.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Diabetic tools
Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
woman flexing muscles
10 strength training exercises.
Blood sugar test
12 practical tips.
Tom Hanks
Stars living with type 1 or type 2.
kenneth fujioka, md
Can Vinegar Treat Diabetes
Middle aged person
Home Healthcare

Prediabetes How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
type 2 diabetes
food fitness planner