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    Diabetes: The Truth About Food Serving Sizes

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    Confused about how much you can eat when you have diabetes? First you need to know how much food is in a serving. It may be different from what you expect.

    Let’s say you eat a cup of rice at dinner. But a serving is actually considered 1/3 cup. So you got three times as many carbs as you thought.

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    To outsmart those mistakes, get to know what a serving size really holds. And for expert help, talk to your dietitian or a certified diabetes educator.

    Fruits: 1 Serving

    1/2 banana
    1 small apple, orange, or pear
    1/2 cup chopped, cooked, or canned fruit

    Vegetables: 1 Serving

    1 cup raw leafy vegetables
    1/2 cup other vegetables cooked, raw (chopped), or canned
    1/2 cup vegetable juice

    Bread, Cereal, Rice, Starchy Vegetables, and Pasta: 1 Serving

    1 slice of bread
    1/2 English muffin, bun, small bagel, or pita bread
    1 6-inch tortilla
    4-6 crackers
    2 rice cakes
    1 ounce ready-to-eat cereal
    1/2 cup cooked cereal, pasta, or bulgur
    1/3 cup cooked rice
    1 small potato or 1/2 large potato
    1/2 cup sweet potatoes or yams
    1/2 cup corn kernels or other starchy vegetables such as winter squash, peas, or lima beans

    Nuts, Poultry, Fish, Eggs, Dry Beans, Cheese, and Meat: 1 Serving

    2-3 ounces cooked lean beef, veal, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey, or fish
    2-3 ounces low-fat natural cheese (such as Swiss, cheddar, Muenster, parmesan, mozzarella, and others)
    1/2 cup cooked dry beans
    1/4 cup tofu
    1 egg (or an equal serving of egg substitute)
    2 tablespoons peanut butter
    2 ounces processed cheese (American)
    1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese
    1/2 cup canned tuna (packed in water)

    Milk and Yogurt: 1 Serving

    1 cup low-fat milk
    1 cup low-fat yogurt (unsweetened, or sweetened with aspartame or other artificial sweeteners)

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD on August 27, 2015
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