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    How Diabetes Affects a Woman's Sexual Health

    By Camille Peri
    WebMD Feature

    Sex is good for diabetes. It's good for your heart and blood flow, helps you sleep, and boosts your mood.

    If you have diabetes and have had painful sex or trouble getting aroused, though, sex may not seem too sexy. About 35% of women with diabetes seem to have sexual issues. That doesn't mean you have to live with them. There's help to get your sex life going again. 

    Recommended Related to Diabetes

    Can I Eat Fruit if I Have Diabetes?

    Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps.

    Read the Can I Eat Fruit if I Have Diabetes? article > >

    "Some women's issues may be more complex to treat than those of men, but most can be treated," says Janis Roszler, a diabetes educator, marriage therapist, and author of Sex and Diabetes: For Him and For Her. "There's no reason for any woman with diabetes to deny herself the opportunity to have a fulfilling and pleasurable sex life."

    Sexual Challenges for Women

    The causes of sexual issues for women with diabetes are less clear than those in men with diabetes. But nerve damage, slowed blood flow to vaginal and genital tissues, and mood and hormone changes may play a part.

    Common sex-stallers include:

    • Vaginal dryness. This is the biggest sexual complaint in women with diabetes. Vaginal dryness is, this  twice as likely if you have diabetes. If you are in menopause or postmenopause, less estrogen may be the cause. If you aren't, damage to the nerves that lubricate your vagina may be. Vaginal dryness can become a painful cycle. If sex hurts because of it, you may tense up during sex, causing more pain, or avoid sex altogether.
    • Vaginal infections. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) may make sex painful. Yeast infections can also cause pain during sex, as well as vaginal dryness. "If you have poorly controlled diabetes, you're more likely to have yeast and other vaginal infections," says David G. Merrero, PhD, president of Health Care and Education at the American Diabetes Association.
    • Sex drive and orgasm issues. Maybe you find it hard to get in the mood. Or you get in the mood but don't climax. Trouble with orgasms is a concern for many women with diabetes. A 2012 study found that women who took insulin for diabetes were 80% more likely to have trouble reaching an orgasm than women who don't have diabetes. The exact reasons for low libido and orgasm troubles are not clear.