Skip to content

Diabetes Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Diabetes

  1. Diabetic Nephropathy - Symptoms

    There are no symptoms in the early stages of diabetic nephropathy. The only sign of kidney damage may be small amounts of protein leaking into the urine (microalbuminuria).

  2. Care of Your Skin When You Have Diabetes - Topic Overview

    If high blood sugar levels have damaged nerves that go to your skin, you may sweat less, and your skin may become dry and cracked. Damaged skin becomes infected more easily when you have diabetes. To prevent skin problems and allow for early treatment of any problems that develop, each day:Inspect your skin, especially on your feet, between your toes, and around your fingernails and toenails. Watch for redness, cuts, scrapes, calluses, or blisters.Keep your skin folds—such as in your groin or under your breasts—dry. Moist areas increase the risk of infection.Dry the area between your toes well after bathing.Use a bath soap that has a moisturizer added. Use soap only as needed (on your feet, underarms, and groin). Avoid using deodorant soaps and antibacterial soaps, which may dry your skin.If your skin is dry, do not use bubble baths. Use a bath oil instead.To prevent dryness and injury:Use a home humidifier during cold weather and in dry climates.Use a moisturizer after you bathe,

  3. Type 1 Diabetes: Medical History and Physical Exam - Topic Overview

    If your doctor thinks that you might have type 1 diabetes, he or she may ask questions about your symptoms, family history of the disease, and personal medical history. Questions for the medical history may include the following:Have you had increased thirst, increased urination, and fatigue?How long have the symptoms been present?Have you had an increase in appetite?Have you lost weight lately?Is there a family history of diabetes?What other medical conditions do you have?What medications are you are currently taking?Have you been ill recently?Has growth and development progressed normally (if the person is a child)?Your doctor will also give you a complete physical exam. You will continue having exams on a regular basis if you are diagnosed with this disease. The physical exam includes: Measuring your height and weight. Children and teens will have their height and weight compared to standards that are normal for their age groups. Checking your blood pressure. For adults, blood

  4. Diabetic Neuropathy - Treatment Overview

    There is currently no cure for diabetic neuropathy. Once it has developed, treatment focuses on preventing the condition from worsening by consistently keeping your blood sugar levels tightly controlled within a narrow target range.

  5. Prediabetes: Exercise Tips - Topic Overview

    If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes,you have an opportunity to prevent the progression of this condition to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that by getting regular exercise,changing your diet,and losing weight,you can play a key role in preventing diabetes. Any type of physical activity may be beneficial,such as: 1 Sports or other types of exercise,such as walking,...

  6. Diabetes: Steps for Foot-Washing - Health Tools

    Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. Diabetes: Taking Care of Your Feet

  7. Prediabetes - What Increases Your Risk

    The risk factors for prediabetes are similar to the risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Most people who develop type 2 diabetes had prediabetes first. Risk factors that you cannot control include: Family history. People who have a parent, brother, or sister with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes have a greater chance of developing these conditions. In the United States, adults who have a parent with ..

  8. Type 1 Diabetes in Children: Emotional Issues - Topic Overview

    A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes can be difficult to deal with at any age,but it can be particularly hard for a child. Children face special emotional and physical challenges in dealing with their disease. Your child will probably experience a wide range of emotions,which may change from minute to minute. Be sure you are as supportive as possible as your child learns how to manage the disease ...

  9. Diabetes: Roles on Your Care Team - Topic Overview

    Your primary care doctor (usually an internist or a family medicine doctor) is responsible for the day-to-day medical management of your diabetes. He or she also may coordinate your diabetes care. Or a nurse practitioner, nurse educator, or physician assistant may coordinate your care.Your health professional will help you find the right oral medicine and possibly insulin to regulate your blood sugar (glucose) level. He or she also will help you adjust medicines as your diabetes changes. For this reason, it is very important that you notify your health professional if your symptoms change. Most primary care doctors are excellent at managing diabetes. But if your symptoms get worse or if you have complications, you may need to see a specialist—a doctor who has additional training in a particular field. You should see some specialists, such as an ophthalmologist and podiatrist, regularly. These specialists provide care to prevent eye and foot complications from diabetes. Other

  10. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

    The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) measures the body's ability to use a type of sugar, called glucose, that is the body's main source of energy. An OGTT can be used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes.

Displaying 111 - 120 of 498 Articles << Prev Page 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Next >>

Today on WebMD

Diabetic tools
Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
woman flexing muscles
10 strength training exercises.
Blood sugar test
12 practical tips.
Tom Hanks
Stars living with type 1 or type 2.
kenneth fujioka, md
Can Vinegar Treat Diabetes
Middle aged person
Home Healthcare

Prediabetes How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
type 2 diabetes
food fitness planner