Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Diabetes Health Center

News and Features Related to Diabetes

  1. Tom Hanks Has Type 2 Diabetes

    By Margaret Farley Steele and Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporters TUESDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Tom Hanks, the Academy Award-winning actor, revealed Monday night that he has joined millions of Americans in a new role -- that of type 2 diabetic. Hanks, 57, was discussing his latest film on CBS'

    Read Full Article
  2. Big Breakfast May Be Best for Diabetes Patients

    By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A hearty breakfast that includes protein and fat may actually help people with type 2 diabetes better control both their hunger and their blood sugar levels. Patients who ate a big breakfast for three months experienced low

    Read Full Article
  3. Common Diabetes Drugs May Carry Risk

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients who take drugs called sulfonylureas as an initial therapy have a higher risk of death than those who take the diabetes drug metformin, a new study says. The British researchers said the findings suggest that

    Read Full Article
  4. Insulin Pump Feature May Prevent Low Blood Sugar

    By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of insulin pump reduced the number of moderate to severe low-blood-sugar episodes experienced by people with type 1 diabetes. The pump has a special sensor that can detect dropping blood-sugar levels and then suspen

    Read Full Article
  5. Diabetes Remission After Surgery

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A simple scoring system can predict whether an obese patient might achieve diabetes remission within five years after weight-loss surgery, according to researchers. The scoring system -- called DiaRem -- is based on four readil

    Read Full Article
  6. Even Younger Women With Diabetes May Face Higher Odds for Heart Disease

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetes in itself -- regardless of other risk factors -- increases the risk of heart disease in women, a new study finds. The study included nearly 1,300 Argentine women, aged 19 to 84, with and without type 2 diabete

    Read Full Article
  7. New Diabetes Drug Seems Safe for Heart: Study

    By E.J. Mundell HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The new diabetes drug Onglyza has no effect, good or bad, on a patient's risk for heart attacks, a new study finds. However, the researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston did find a surprising rise in hospitalizatio

    Read Full Article
  8. Whole Fruits Tied to Lower Diabetes Risk

    By Randy Dotinga HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- It's no secret that fruit is good for you. But what kind? A new study links whole fruits -- especially blueberries, grapes and apples -- to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but suggests that fruit juices may actually raise the r

    Read Full Article
  9. Family History of Diabetes and Prediabetes Risk

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Before full-blown diabetes sets in, people typically develop a syndrome known as "prediabetes." Now a new study shows that people who are not obese but who have a family history of diabetes are at higher risk of becoming predi

    Read Full Article
  10. Diabetes Symptoms to Never Ignore

    One of the keys to leading a healthy life with diabetes is to keep your glucose levels, or blood sugar, in check. As your main source of energy, glucose plays a big role in keeping your body working like it should. If you have either type of diabetes, you need to be aware of symptoms that may mean y

    Read Full Article
Displaying 101 - 110 of 1093 Articles << Prev Page 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Next >>

Is This Normal? Get the Facts Fast!

Check Your Blood Sugar Level Now
What type of diabetes do you have?
Your gender:

Get the latest Diabetes newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Low
0-69
Normal
70-130
High
131+

Your level is currently

If the level is below 70 or you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Did You Know Your Lifestyle Choices
Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Use the Blood Glucose Tracker to monitor
how well you manage your blood sugar over time.

Get Started

This tool is not intended for women who are pregnant.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

Diabetic tools
Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
woman flexing muscles
10 strength training exercises.
 
Blood sugar test
12 practical tips.
Tom Hanks
Stars living with type 1 or type 2.
 
Woman serving fast food from window
Video
Can Vinegar Treat Diabetes
Video
 
Middle aged person
Tool
are battery operated toothbrushes really better
Video
 

Prediabetes How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Article
type 2 diabetes
Slideshow
 
food fitness planner
Tool
Are You at Risk for Dupuytrens Contracture
Article