Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Diabetes Health Center

Font Size

Islet Cell Transplants: Continued Success

A Year After Islet Cell Transplants, Most Recipients Are Insulin Free
By
WebMD Health News

March 28, 2003 (Salt Lake City) -- Joan Husband of Edmonton, Alberta, was a captive of her disease: She couldn't work, drive a car, or even take a stroll around the block without the possibility of losing consciousness. But a year after undergoing an experimental procedure, Husband says, "I'm driving, I've returned to work part time. I'm planning a life with my husband."

Husband's disease is type 1 diabetes, also called insulin-dependent or juvenile-onset diabetes. After years of controlling her disease with insulin injections, Husband's disease was out of control. The insulin was no longer able to regulate the level of sugar in her blood, and her disease was so unstable that she could lose consciousness with no warning, she says.

Just over a year ago she received an islet cell transplant at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton. "And my world changed," says Husband. Richard Owen, MD, assistant clinical professor of radiology at the University of Alberta, transplanted hundreds of thousands of islet cells into her liver.

Islet cells produce insulin, which allows the body to take sugar from the blood and supply it to cells, which in turn use sugar for fuel. At birth, a healthy pancreas has about 2 million islet cells, but when a person develops type 1 diabetes these cells are killed, which drastically reduces insulin levels and causes the sugar imbalance seen in diabetic people.

Though the cells are transplanted into the liver rather than the pancreas, once the cells become embedded in the liver they immediately begin producing insulin, says Owen.

To date, about 250 to 300 patients worldwide have undergone islet cell transplantation using the technique developed in Edmonton. Speaking at the 28th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology, Owen presented results from the first 48 patients.

Twenty-six of those patients -- including Husband -- have reached the one-year mark and 21 of them are completely insulin free (no longer taking insulin). Husband is one of those insulin-free patients. Seven patients were transplanted at least two years ago and four of them are insulin free, while three of four patients who reached the three-year mark are still insulin-free.

"There are no miracles in medicine, but this is a significant step forward in the treatment of diabetes. Someday we will have a cure," Owen tells WebMD.

Michael Darcy, MD, president of the society and a professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, says that the "Edmonton protocol," as the islet cell transplants are known, represents a significant breakthrough in treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. But Darcy, who was not involved in the Canadian study, cautions that islet cell transplantation is still experimental and should be considered only for patients who are unable to control their diabetes with insulin.

Is This Normal? Get the Facts Fast!

Check Your Blood Sugar Level Now
What type of diabetes do you have?
Your gender:

Get the latest Diabetes newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Low
0-69
Normal
70-130
High
131+

Your level is currently

If the level is below 70 or you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Did You Know Your Lifestyle Choices
Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Use the Blood Glucose Tracker to monitor
how well you manage your blood sugar over time.

Get Started

This tool is not intended for women who are pregnant.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

Diabetic tools
Symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
woman flexing muscles
10 strength training exercises.
 
Blood sugar test
12 practical tips.
Tom Hanks
Stars living with type 1 or type 2.
 
Woman serving fast food from window
Video
Can Vinegar Treat Diabetes
Video
 
Middle aged person
Tool
are battery operated toothbrushes really better
Video
 

Prediabetes How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes
Article
type 2 diabetes
Slideshow
 
food fitness planner
Tool
Are You at Risk for Dupuytrens Contracture
Article