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Diabetes Health Center

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Needle-Free 'Breathalyzer' for Daily Diabetes Testing Shows Promise

But first, device must undergo clinical studies

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Serena Gordon

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 13 (HealthDay News) -- People with diabetes have to prick their fingers multiple times a day to monitor their blood sugar levels, but researchers report that someday patients may be able to do that simply by checking their breath.

A hand-held device would measure levels of the chemical acetone in someone's breath. Acetone levels rise when blood sugar levels rise, and acetone is responsible for the sweet, fruity smell on the breath of people with diabetes who have high blood sugar levels.

What hasn't yet been proven is whether or not blood sugar levels reliably rise and fall with acetone levels, according to the study's lead researcher, Ronny Priefer, a professor of medicinal chemistry at Western New England University in Springfield, Mass.

"If we can successfully show that there is a linear correlation between acetone levels and blood glucose [sugar] levels, the ease of which an individual with diabetes can monitor their disease state should be dramatically simplified," Priefer said.

He added that a simple breath test to measure blood sugar levels might help patients better manage their disease, too, because it won't hurt like a finger prick to get the information needed to guide treatment decisions.

Results of the study were scheduled to be presented Wednesday at the annual meeting of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, held in San Antonio, Texas.

People with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes have to measure their blood sugar levels to monitor how well treatments are working. Blood sugar checks are especially important for people with type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease that always requires treatment with insulin. People with type 1 diabetes may check their blood sugar levels as many as six or more times a day, according to JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation).

People with type 2 diabetes who use insulin also need to check their blood sugar levels more frequently than those who don't use insulin. For those dependent on insulin, a blood sugar check tells them whether or not they need more insulin, and helps guide the decision on how much insulin is needed.

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