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News Related to Diabetes

  1. Vitamin D Levels Linked to Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests. The study included almost 150 people in Spain. Their vitamin D levels

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  2. Study Links Lack of Sleep to Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study helps explain why getting too little sleep might boost diabetes risk. Researchers say lack of sleep can lead to increased levels of substances called free fatty acids in the blood. These substances interfere

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  3. Drugs for Diabetes-Linked Eye Disease Compared

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A vision-robbing condition called diabetic macular edema can strike people with diabetes. Now, a new study compared three leading drugs for the condition -- Avastin, Eylea and Lucentis -- and found that Eylea came out o

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  4. This Diet Risky for Those With Kidney Disease

    By Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Feb. 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Patients struggling with chronic kidney disease who routinely consume meat-rich, highly acidic diets may boost their risk for kidney failure, a new study suggests. According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, kidney d

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  5. BP Meds Lower Heart, Stroke Risks in Diabetics

    By Randy Dotinga HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new analysis shows that people with type 2 diabetes are less likely to suffer heart attacks, strokes or die early when they take blood pressure medications -- even if they don't actually have high blood pressure. "Strok

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  6. FDA Approves 1st Drug for Diabetic Retinopathy

    By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Feb. 6, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved the drug Lucentis (ranibizumab) to treat diabetic retinopathy in patients with diabetic macular edema. A leading cause of blindness among adults in the United State

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  7. Type 1 Diabetes More Deadly for Women Than Men

    By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with type 1 diabetes have a nearly 40 percent greater risk of dying from any cause and more than double the risk of dying from heart disease than men with type 1 diabetes, Australian researchers report. In an anal

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  8. Gut Bacteria Change and Kids' Type 1 Diabetes

    By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Feb. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In some young children who develop type 1 diabetes, a change in normal stomach bacteria can precede the disease by a year, a small study has found. The findings, published Feb. 5 in the journal Cell, Host & Microbe, are base

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  9. 1 in 5 Younger Diabetics Lacks Good Medical Care

    By EJ Mundell HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Feb. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One in every five young American adults with diabetes hasn't seen a doctor in the past 6 months, a new government report indicates. The study, from researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also foun

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  10. Are Seniors With Diabetes Overtreated?

    By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many older people with diabetes may be exposed to potential harm because doctors are trying to keep overly tight control of their blood sugar levels, a new study argues. Researchers found that nearly two-thirds of older

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 1019 Articles Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >>

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Normal
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If the level is below 70 or you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

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