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News Related to Diabetes

  1. Aggressive Diabetes Therapy May Raise Death Risk

    March 2, 2011 -- New results from a large government-run trial confirm that very aggressive treatment to lower blood sugar is associated with an increased risk of death in people with type 2 at high risk for heart attack and stroke. The five-year follow-up from the Action to Control Cardiovascular R

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  2. Diabetes Risks Go Beyond Heart Attacks, Strokes

    March 2, 2011 -- Diabetes roughly doubles the risk of having a heart attack or stroke, a reality that’s put many doctors and patients on alert about the need to closely watch blood pressure, cholesterol, and other harbingers of an ailing cardiovascular system. But less attention has been paid to oth

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  3. Mutant Gene Found in Many With Type 2 Diabetes

    March 1, 2011 -- Mutations in a particular gene occur in nearly 10% of type 2 diabetes patients of white European descent, an international study finds. The gene, called HMGA1, regulates the way the body responds to insulin. Mutant versions of the gene are linked to insulin resistance, a key feature

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  4. Breastfeeding by Diabetic Moms Cuts Babies’ Obesity Risk

    Feb. 25, 2011 -- Breastfeeding for six months or more may reduce the risk that babies born to diabetic mothers become obese later in life, a new study shows. “This is perhaps the first study to show that, indeed, if these babies are breastfed as recommended, or more, then their increased risk of obe

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  5. Fatty Liver May Be Linked to Diabetes Risk

    Feb. 25, 2011 -- Having an accumulation of fat in your liver cells may raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes regardless of the fat in other places of your body. A new study suggests that fatty liver disease, also known as fatty liver, may be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Re

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  6. What’s the Best Test for Children’s Diabetes?

    Feb. 25, 2011 -- A simple blood test that measures long-term glucose levels -- the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test -- may not be the best way to diagnose diabetes in adolescents. The HbA1c screening test is easier to perform than the fasting plasma glucose test, which requires fasting for eight hours. B

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  7. Cold Virus May Trigger Type 1 Diabetes

    Feb. 3, 2011 -- A common cold virus could trigger type 1 diabetes in at-risk children, a new research review suggests. The finding could help explain a dramatic rise in diabetes incidence among very young children, and could even lead to better ways to prevent and treat the disease, researchers say.

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  8. Artificial Pancreas Could Help Pregnant Diabetic Women

    Jan. 31, 2011 -- For the first time, research has successfully demonstrated the potential benefits of an artificial pancreas in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. It’s hoped the development, funded by Diabetes UK, could drastically reduce cases of stillbirth and mortality rates among pregnant wome

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  9. CDC: 26 Million Americans Have Diabetes

    Jan. 26, 2011 -- The CDC says about 26 million adult Americans have diabetes and that 79 million more have prediabetes, a condition that raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not so

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  10. Taking 10,000 Steps a Day May Lower Diabetes Risk

    Jan. 14, 2011 -- Building up to 10,000 steps a day can help control weight and may reduce diabetes risk, suggests new research in the journal BMJ. Of 592 middle-aged Australian adults, those who increased the number of steps they took during a five-year period and built up to 10,000 steps per day ha

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Displaying 171 - 180 of 940 Articles << Prev Page 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Next >>

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Normal
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If the level is below 70 and you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

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