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News Related to Diabetes

  1. Poor People With Diabetes More Likely to Lose Limb

    By Mary Elizabeth Dallas HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Aug. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Poor people with diabetes are much more likely to lose a limb to the disease than affluent patients are, new research suggests. Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, found the odds of having a

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  2. FDA Approves New Type 2 Diabetes Drug

    By EJ Mundell HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Aug. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Friday that it approved a new drug, Jardiance, to help fight type 2 diabetes. Jardiance (empagliflozin) "can be used alone or added to existing treatment regimens to control b

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  3. Young Adults With Diabetes & Jump in Doctor Visits

    By EJ Mundell HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, July 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new report finds that by 2010, one in every 10 visits Americans made to their doctor's office involved diabetes, with the greatest rise among those aged 25 to 44. Data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevent

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  4. Diabetes May Raise Risk for Head and Neck Cancer

    July 29, 2014 -- The risk for head and neck cancer is higher in people with diabetes than in those without diabetes, according to a new study. That risk is greater for people 40 to 65 years old.  Kuo-Shu Tseng, PhD, from Tainan University of Technology in Taiwan, and colleagues compared the records

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  5. Healthy 'Brown Fat' May Cut Odds for Diabetes

    By Mary Elizabeth Dallas HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, July 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with higher levels of brown fat have a reduced risk for obesity and diabetes, a new study suggests. Unlike white fat, which lowers insulin sensitivity, researchers found that brown fat actually improves insu

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  6. Study Links Shift Work to Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    By Mary Elizabeth Dallas HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Shift workers, especially men, may be at higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to people not on such schedules, a new study suggests. Also at special risk are shift workers who don't work on a set schedule, wi

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  7. Diabetes: This May Someday Replace Needle Prick

    By Serena Gordon HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, July 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of sensor for people with diabetes is being developed to measure sugar levels in the body using saliva instead of blood, researchers report. Scientists at Brown University in Providence, R.I., created the sensor

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  8. Aerobic & Strength Training Combo for Diabetes

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, July 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of aerobic and resistance training may work better than either type of exercise alone in helping people with diabetes control their blood sugar, a new review finds. Researchers analyzed data from 14 studies

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  9. Insulin Pumps vs. Daily Injections for Type 2

    By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, July 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin pumps provide better blood sugar control for adults with diabetes than multiple daily insulin injections, a new study says. Insulin pumps are small devices that are worn by patients and deliver constant amounts o

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  10. Inhaled Insulin Afrezza: FAQ

    June 30, 2014 -- Millions of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes will have another treatment option now that the FDA has approved an inhaled insulin. Called Afrezza, the rapid-acting insulin is taken before each meal, or soon after starting to eat, with no needles required. Afrezza won't replace t

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Normal
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If the level is below 70 or you are experiencing symptoms such as shaking, sweating or difficulty thinking, you will need to raise the number immediately. A quick solution is to eat a few pieces of hard candy or 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey. Recheck your numbers again in 15 minutes to see if the number has gone up. If not, repeat the steps above or call your doctor.

People who experience hypoglycemia several times in a week should call their health care provider. It's important to monitor your levels each day so you can make sure your numbers are within the range. If you are pregnant always consult with your health care provider.

Congratulations on taking steps to manage your health.

However, it's important to continue to track your numbers so that you can make lifestyle changes if needed. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

Your level is high if this reading was taken before eating. Aim for 70-130 before meals and less than 180 two hours after meals.

Even if your number is high, it's not too late for you to take control of your health and lower your blood sugar.

One of the first steps is to monitor your levels each day. If you are pregnant always consult with your physician.

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