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Researchers weigh results of 8 studies, find excess pounds raise death risk over time

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Dec. 2, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- The notion that some people can be overweight or obese and still remain healthy is a myth, according to a new Canadian study.

Even without high blood pressure, diabetes or other metabolic issues, overweight and obese people have higher rates of death, heart attack and stroke after 10 years compared with their thinner counterparts, the researchers found.

"These data suggest that increased body weight is not a benign condition, even in the absence of metabolic abnormalities, and argue against the concept of healthy obesity or benign obesity," said researcher Dr. Ravi Retnakaran, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Toronto.

The terms healthy obesity and benign obesity have been used to describe people who are obese but don't have the abnormalities that typically accompany obesity, such as high blood pressure, high blood sugar and high cholesterol, Retnakaran explained.

"We found that metabolically healthy obese individuals are indeed at increased risk for death and cardiovascular events over the long term as compared with metabolically healthy normal-weight individuals," he added.

It's possible that obese people who appear metabolically healthy have low levels of some risk factors that worsen over time, the researchers suggest in the report, published online Dec. 3 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center, welcomed the report. "Given the recent attention to the 'obesity paradox' in the professional literature and pop culture alike, this is a very timely and important paper," Katz said. (The obesity paradox holds that certain people benefit from chronic obesity.)

Some obese people appear healthy because not all weight gain is harmful, Katz said. "It depends partly on genes, partly on the source of calories, partly on activity levels, partly on hormone levels. Weight gain in the lower extremities among younger women tends to be metabolically harmless; weight gain as fat in the liver can be harmful at very low levels," Katz said.

A number of things, however, work to increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and death over time, he added.

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