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Foods to Fight Fatigue

(continued)

Beating the Doldrums

Food can raise or diminish your body's energy levels. If you are eating healthy and are still tired, try changing the frequency of your meals. Some people find they get more of a boost with several small meals throughout the day, while others prefer the concept of three square meals daily. There's no right or wrong way, says Sandquist, noting that everyone's energy needs differ.

The amount of food you eat can also make a difference. If someone overeats constantly, he or she tends to gain more weight and become lethargic, says Finley. "It's like the snowball rolling down the hill," he explains. "As [overeaters] get more overweight, they have less energy, and then they exercise less and don't burn the calories."

Other dietary reasons for fatigue include too much alcohol (which is a depressant) and lack of certain vitamins and minerals. Low iron is a common problem for women.

If you still find yourself sluggish with a well-balanced diet, then a visit to the doctor may be in order. Certain diseases, medications, stress, and inadequate sleep and exercise can contribute to fatigue.

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Reviewed on January 09, 2013
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