Skip to content

No Evidence It Works

Not everyone is so gung-ho on the benefits of mesotherapy. Even though it was recognized in 1987 by the French Academy of Medicine as a part of traditional medicine, there have been no proven scientific benefits or merits, says Rod Rohrich, MD, president-elect of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and chairman of plastic surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "This borders on medical experimentation," he says. "Injecting unknown substances into someone with multiple needle sticks is almost unconscionable."

Rohrich adds that proponents of mesotherapy say it can be used for almost anything, "but with no scientific data, this should not be done on human beings.

"This is just another fad," Rohrich says. "It preys on the consumer who wants to look for a quick solution, but there are no shortcuts to good health."

That's what Leroy Young, MD, says as well. To Young, chairman of the nonsurgical procedures committee for the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, mesotherapy is nothing more than "quackery."

"There's just no proof that it works for any kind of fat," he says, adding that even those doctors who are in favor of mesotherapy advise their patients to eat well and exercise more. "If you eat properly and burn more calories, then guess what? You're going to lose the fat," says Young.

Wendy Lewis, author of The Beauty Battle and a skin care and surgery consultant who counsels men and women in both the U.S. and the U.K. about cosmetic surgery, face and body treatments, and anti-aging issues, agrees with Rohrich and Young. "Mesotherapy is being touted as a cure for just about everything," she says. "But there are no guidelines and nothing documented."

Every doctor has his or her own "cocktail" of drugs, says Lewis. "My fear is that you really don't know what they're injecting into you." If you do decide to go ahead with the treatment, Lewis says that it's important to do your homework first. "You need to know what is being injected into you, what are the side effects, how many injections you'll need, the fees ... get as much information as you can up front."

At this time, mesotherapists in the U.S. don't have to be licensed, although efforts are under way to establish a chapter of the International Society of Mesotherapy in this country. At the moment, though, says Lewis, there is no way to qualify those who are offering the treatment. "I think it's tricky stuff," says Lewis. But if you want to do it, "pay attention and ask questions."

WebMD Feature

Healthy Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.

Top searches: Chicken, Chocolate, Salad, Desserts, Soup

Heart Rate Calculator

Ensure you're exercising hard enough to get a good workout, but not strain your heart.

While you are exercising, you should count between...