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The G-Free Diet

The Promise

What if avoiding gluten could change your health? It happened for Elisabeth Hasselbeck, author of The G-Free Diet and a former co-host on The View

Her diet is all about quitting gluten(that means no wheat, rye, barley), which is a must if you have celiac disease. If someone who has celiac disease eats gluten, their immune system damages their small intestine.

Hasselbeck self-diagnosed her celiac disease after years of being told by doctors that she had irritable bowel syndrome. She researched it and eventually realized that she had celiac disease. A doctor later confirmed that. 

The G-Free Diet has tips for avoiding gluten when you’re dining out, at a party, or enjoying an evening at home. Hasselbeck guides you through the ins and outs of going gluten-free, unearthing surprising gluten sources, teaching the best way to decode food labels, and more. 

What You Can Eat and What You Can't

On the G-Free Diet, you’ll avoid all foods that contain gluten, which means anything made with wheat, rye, barley, and certain oats that have been processed in the same facility as wheat.

Some sources of gluten may surprise you, like beer, fried foods, soy sauce, and some dairy substitutes. Wine, champagne, sake, and tequila are generally gluten-free and are allowed on the G-Free Diet.

Level of Effort: Medium to High

It's a commitment to go gluten-free, but it's becoming more common, and there are more gluten-free products available.

Limitations: It’s restrictive, in that you have to remove all gluten from your diet.

Cooking and shopping: You'll need to shop, cook, and eat out in a gluten-free way. While Hasselbeck does a good job showing how to live life to the fullest without gluten, her book doesn't include weekly meal plans or more than a few recipes.

Packaged foods or meals? None required.

In-person meetings? No.

Exercise: Hasselbeck recommends exercise to stay fit and healthy and control stress, but she doesn't go into detail.

Does It Allow for Dietary Restrictions or Preferences?

This diet focuses on gluten. You can adapt it to fit a vegetarian or vegan diet. It could also work if you're cutting down on salt and fat.

What Else You Should Know

Cost: You will probably spend a bit more on groceries if you buy gluten-free convenience foods.

Support: You do this diet on your own.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Maryann Tomovich Jacobsen, MS, RD on December 11, 2013

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