Your Omega-3 Family Shopping List

Omega-3s may help lower your risk of heart disease. These healthy fats are being added to everything from eggs to peanut butter. You can also get them naturally in fish, including salmon and tuna.

There are different types of omega-3s: ALA (alpha-linolenic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid).

Your body can turn ALA into DHA and EPA, though not very efficiently. So, many dietitians recommend getting DHA and EPA. (Plant based ALA is only about 10% as effective as marine based DHA and EPA.) While there's no standard recommendation for how many omega-3s we need, dieticians consider the Adequate Intake (AI) for adults to be 1600 milligrams (mg) for men and 1100 mg for women. You can find more than 500 mg in a can of tuna or a few ounces of salmon. Some fortified foods offer 100 mg or more.

Bring this shopping list the next time you go to the supermarket.

Fish: Top Source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Look for seafood rich in omega-3s, such as:

  • Halibut
  • Herring
  • Mackerel
  • Oysters
  • Salmon
  • Sardines
  • Trout
  • Tuna (fresh)

Dairy and Juices Fortified With Omega-3s

You'll likely find the following foods fortified with omega-3 fatty acids:

  • Eggs
  • Margarine
  • Milk
  • Juice
  • Soy milk
  • Yogurt

Grains and Nuts With Omega-3s

Bread and pasta are some of the foods may have omega-3s added to them. These fats are also naturally found in whole foods like seeds and nuts. When shopping, look for omega-3s in:

  • Bread
  • Cereal
  • Flaxseed
  • Flour
  • Pasta
  • Peanut butter
  • Oatmeal
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Pizza, packaged
  • Flour tortillas
  • Walnuts

Fresh Produce With ALA Omega-3s

Vegetables, especially green leafy ones, are good sources of ALA, one form of omega-3 fatty acids. Although ALA isn't as powerful as the other omega-3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA, these vegetables also have fiber and other nutrients, as well as omega-3s.

  • Brussels sprouts
  • Kale
  • Spinach
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower

 

Oil With ALA Omega-3s

Oils can be a good source of ALA omega-3s, too, including:

  • Canola oil
  • Cod liver oil
  • Flaxseed oil
  • Mustard oil
  • Soybean oil
  • Walnut oil

Baby Food With Omega-3s

Research suggests that the omega-3 fatty acid DHA may help babies' brains develop, which is why you may find them in:

  • Baby cereals
  • Infant formula
  • Jars of baby food

Continued

Other Omega-3-Enhanced Products

You can also find omega-3s in:

As with most nutrients, whole foods trump any enriched, fortified, or processed foods. Omega fatty acids can oxidize if overly processed or allowed to become stale, so fresh is best.

Getting more than 3 grams a day of omega-3s may make bleeding more likely. You're not likely to get that much from a typical diet. Talk with your doctor before taking high doses of omega-3 supplements.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Ellen Stokes, RD, LD on June 18, 2017

Sources

SOURCES:
Pereira, C.  International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research, July 2001.
University of Maryland Medical Center: "Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)."
Peck, P. Medscape Medical News, Nov. 11, 2004.
Oregon State University, Linus Pauling Institute: "Essential Fatty Acids."
WebMD Medical Reference: "Omega-3 Fatty Acids."

© 2017 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Pagination