Skip to content

How Can I Safely Get on a Liquid Diet?

First, talk to your doctor about whether a liquid diet is appropriate for you. Pregnant or nursing women, and people who take insulin for diabetes, or anyone with a chronic illness shouldn't go on a liquid diet.

If your doctor gives you the OK to go on a liquid diet, you should also see a registered dietitian, who can go over the diet with you and make sure you're getting enough calories and nutrition. Your dietitian might recommend that you take a vitamin or nutritional supplement while you're on the liquid diet.

Before you choose a liquid diet plan, know what you're drinking. If you're considering one of the commercial diets, look at the daily values on the nutrition facts label. Be sure you're getting 100% of all the recommended vitamins and minerals.

You may also want to pick a diet that is not too low in calories and contains plenty of protein and fiber to keep you feeling full while you lose the weight gradually. Liquid diets that include a solid meal or two per day, or that teach you healthier eating habits, will be more likely to help you keep the weight off in the long run.

WebMD Medical Reference

Healthy Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.

Top searches: Chicken, Chocolate, Salad, Desserts, Soup

Heart Rate Calculator

Ensure you're exercising hard enough to get a good workout, but not strain your heart.

While you are exercising, you should count between...