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So-called 'bariatric' procedures appear to cut risk of atrial fibrillation, researchers report

By Maureen Salamon

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-loss surgery not only helps obese people drop pounds, but it may also prevent the dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation, according to new research.

Scientists from the Mayo Clinic found that significantly fewer patients who underwent weight-loss surgery, also known as "bariatric" surgery, developed atrial fibrillation -- a rapid and irregular heartbeat -- than those who didn't have weight-loss surgery. Atrial fibrillation affects more than 2.7 million American adults.

Common types of weight-loss surgery include the gastric band, in which a band is placed to create a small stomach pouch, and gastric bypass, which allows food to bypass parts of the stomach.

The study is the first to demonstrate a relationship between bariatric surgery and lower rates of atrial fibrillation in a large patient sample. Weight-loss surgery has already been shown in prior research to improve or resolve many obesity-related conditions, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and some types of heart disease.

"I think we know that bariatric surgery does good things for people from a cardiovascular risk profile," said Dr. Michael Gold, director of cardiology at Medical University of South Carolina, who wasn't involved in the research. "Now we're starting to go downstream from that to look at more long-term impacts . . . and atrial fibrillation is one of those. It's a logical consequence of what we already know."

The study, from Dr. Yong-Mei Cha and colleagues, was scheduled for presentation Wednesday at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society's annual conference, in San Francisco. Research presented at scientific meetings typically has not been peer-reviewed or published, and results are considered preliminary.

More than one-third of American adults are classified as obese, with a body mass index (BMI) exceeding 30. BMI is a measurement based on height and weight. About 160,000 weight-loss surgeries are performed each year in the United States, according to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Several different surgical procedures exist, but all seek to reduce the capacity of the stomach, which allows fewer calories to be consumed and/or absorbed.

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