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Modest reduction not significantly better than diet drugs or other surgeries

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A device intended to help with weight loss by blocking a certain nerve linked to appetite and metabolism failed to meet expectations in a trial among obese patients.

Using electric impulses to block the vagus nerve, which runs between the brain and stomach, researchers hoped to suppress feelings of hunger. And, they did, just not to the extent they anticipated.

"A device that safely blocks the nerve that connects the brain to the gut can help people lose weight," said lead researcher Dr. Charles Billington, an endocrinologist and weight management specialist at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis.

Just not as much as had been hoped.

The device, which is similar in size to a pacemaker, is implanted in the patient's abdomen with its electrodes touching the vagus nerve at a point between the esophagus and the stomach. Periodically, the device delivers electric impulses that block nerve impulses leaving patients with less of an appetite and feeling fuller, the researchers say.

After a year, Billington's team had hoped to see the 162 patients with the device lose 10 percent more excess weight than the 77 patients given a sham device.

However, the margin of weight loss was only 8.5 percent in favor of the device compared to the sham procedure. Patients with the real device lost about 24 percent of their excess weight, compared with 16 percent among those with the sham device, the researchers found.

Moreover, fewer people using the device lost significant amounts of weight (20 or 25 percent of their excess weight) than the researchers expected.

The report was published Sept. 3 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Dr. Philip Schauer, a bariatric surgeon, and director of the Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, Cleveland Clinic, said that given the modest amount of weight loss with the device compared with diet and exercise alone, he "wouldn't jump on the bandwagon yet."

"On the one hand the study does validate this concept, but on the other hand the amount of weight loss was modest," he said.

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