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What's the best way to keep from binging?

When it comes to our favorite treat foods, is it out of sight, out of mind -- or does absence make the stomach grow fonder? Some diet experts recommend removing favorite high-calorie foods from your house to lessen temptation and prevent overeating. Others believe that banishing favorite foods only makes you want them more – so you're more likely to binge once you do get your hands on them.

As many things in life, the truth probably rests somewhere in the middle. I personally promote the idea of eating when you're hungry, in a mindful and relaxed state. And I discourage anything related to obsession and deprivation. Yet we all come to the table with our own psychological and physical issues, which can complicate things a bit.

The Chocolate Box Syndrome

Here’s an example of the "absence makes the heart grow fonder" way of approaching favorite foods. About 10 years ago, I met a woman who told me that every time she bought a box of Sees chocolates, she ended up eating the entire box in a day. She asked me what she could do to stop this. I asked her if Sees chocolate was really special to her, and she answered, "Yes, it’s one of my favorite things." I asked her if this was something she let herself have only on rare occasions, and she said yes.

I suggested she try buying a box of Sees chocolates and putting it in her refrigerator or freezer. Then, every time she truly wanted a chocolate, she could sit quietly and really savor one piece. Two weeks later, she happily told me she still had a partially full box of chocolates in her refrigerator. She had enjoyed a handful of pieces and was looking forward to having a few more in the weeks to come. Just knowing she could have one when she truly wanted one gave her comfort and helped prevent her from overeating.

This technique may not work well for everyone, but it seems to be the ticket for others, myself included. I am not a compulsive eater and I credit this to my "no-deprivation" philosophy. If there's something I really want, and the craving doesn’t go away easily, I let myself have it. I do, however, make light and healthful choices within those cravings when possible (often because of my irritable bowel syndrome). For example, maybe once a year I strongly desire a donut. So I go to a local donut store that sells delicious whole-wheat donuts and, bite by bite, I enjoy eating one.

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