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Screening for Weight Problems - Topic Overview

Children

Doctors weigh children at routine checkups. They plot measurements on a growth chart to see how your child compares physically to other children of the same age. Doctors update the chart at each routine exam to document your child's growth pattern.

"Overweight" and "obese" are terms sometimes used when referring to children who weigh more than expected. Doctors use growth charts or the body mass index (BMI) to measure a child's weight in relation to his or her height. If your child is age 2 or older, find out his or her BMI with this Interactive Tool: What Is Your Child's BMI?

If you have concerns that your child is overweight or obese, ask your doctor to review your child's growth charts and medical history with you.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends using BMI to screen children ages 6 to 18 for obesity.1

  • If your child's BMI has been high on the growth chart from birth, this may be his or her healthy size and growth rate. He or she may simply be bigger than other children of the same gender and age.
  • If your child's BMI pattern has suddenly jumped from a lower range to a higher range on the growth chart, your child may be at risk of becoming overweight. Your doctor will carefully track growth over time, watching for a change in the rate of weight gain. Your child may need counseling and other help to make lifestyle changes for a healthier weight.
  • If your family has a history of obesity, your child has a higher risk of becoming overweight.

Sometimes a child's BMI and weight can increase without a child being at risk of having too much body fat. For instance, before and during puberty it is normal for children to have a significant gain in weight before they begin to grow in height. Also, children who are very muscular (such as children who are very active in sports), may have a high BMI but have normal or even lower-than-normal amounts of body fat.

If your child's BMI and growth pattern suggest a weight problem, your doctor will give your child an exam that looks for health problems that can cause weight gain. This may include questions about eating and physical activity habits. Routine checkups for health problems will also be important over time.

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