Diverticulitis Diet

Sometimes, especially as they get older, people can develop little bulging pouches in the lining of the large intestine. These are called diverticula, and the condition is known as diverticulosis.

When the pouches become inflamed or infected, it leads to a sometimes very painful condition called diverticulitis. In addition to having abdominal pain, people with diverticulitis may experience nausea, vomiting, bloating, fever, constipation, or diarrhea.

Many experts believe that a low-fiber diet can lead to diverticulosis and diverticulitis. This may be why people in Asia and Africa, where the diet tends to be higher in fiber, have a very low incidence of the condition.

Diverticulosis usually causes no or few symptoms; leaving many people unaware that they even have diverticula present.

Diverticulitis may need to be treated with antibiotics or, in severe cases, surgery.

Diet for Diverticulitis

If you're experiencing severe symptoms from diverticulitis, your doctor may recommend a liquid diverticulitis diet as part of your treatment, which can include:

  • Water
  • Fruit juices
  • Broth
  • Ice pops

Gradually you can ease back into a regular diet. Your doctor may advise you to start with low-fiber foods (white bread, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products) before introducing high-fiber foods.

Fiber softens and adds bulk to stools, helping them pass more easily through the colon. It also reduces pressure in the digestive tract.

Many studies show that eating fiber-rich foods can help control diverticular symptoms. Women younger than 51 should aim for 25 grams of fiber daily. Men younger than 51 should aim for 38 grams of fiber daily. Women 51 and older should get 21 grams daily. Men 51 and older should get 30 grams daily.  

Here are a few fiber-rich foods to include in meals:

  • Whole-grain breads, pastas, and cereals
  • Beans (kidney beans and black beans, for example)
  • Fresh fruits (apples, pears, prunes)
  • Vegetables (squash, potatoes, peas, spinach)

If you're having difficulty structuring a diet on your own, consult your doctor or a dietitian. They can set up a meal plan that works for you.

Your doctor may also recommend a fiber supplement, such as psyllium (Metamucil) or methylcellulose (Citrucel) one to three times a day. Drinking enough water and other fluids throughout the day will also help prevent constipation.

Continued

Foods to Avoid With Diverticulitis

In the past, doctors had recommended that people with diverticular disease (diverticulosis or diverticulitis) avoid hard-to-digest foods such as nuts, corn, popcorn, and seeds, for fear that these foods would get stuck in the diverticula and lead to inflammation. However, recent research has noted that there is no real scientific evidence to back up this recommendation.

In fact, nuts and seeds are components of many high-fiber foods, which are recommended for people with diverticular disease.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD on May 08, 2016

Sources

SOURCES:

Salzman, H. American Family Physician, 2005; vol 72: pp 1229-1234.

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse web site: "Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis."

Strate, L.L. The Journal of the American Medical Association, 2008; vol 300: pp 907-914.

Feldman, M., Friedman L.S., Brandt L.J. (editors) Sleisenger & Fordtran's Gastrointestinal Liver Disease, 8th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2006.

Institute of Medicine. 

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