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Medical Reference Related to Digestive Disorders

  1. Rectal Prolapse - Frequently Asked Questions

    Learning about rectal prolapse: What is rectal prolapse? What are the risk factors in adults? What are the risk factors in children? Getting treatment: Is surgery ever used? Ongoing concerns: How can I get more fiber in my diet? What are Kegel exercises? ...

  2. Peritonitis

    WebMD explains peritonitis - a potentially fatal inflammation of the abdomen's lining - including its causes, symptoms, and treatments.

  3. What Is a Pancreatic Pseudocyst?

    WebMD explains pancreatic pseudocysts, including symptoms, causes, and treatments.

  4. Blood in Stool

    WebMD explains the causes of bloody stools, the tests to diagnose the underlying problem, and treatment options.

  5. Dumping Syndrome

    WebMD explains the symptoms and causes of dumping syndrome, foods that trigger it, and how to treat it.

  6. Rectal Prolapse in Adults - Topic Overview

    Rectal prolapse in adults mostly occurs in women age 60 and older. Things that can increase the risk of rectal prolapse include:Structural malformation or damage from childbirth or injury. Some people develop rectal prolapse as a result of a condition they have had since birth, such as an abnormal structure of pelvic muscles. Also, childbirth or a back injury can damage structures, organs, or nerves in the pelvic area. This can make proper function of the intestines more difficult.Surgery. Surgery on the anus or rectum can affect rectal function. Also, surgery on a woman's reproductive organs, such as removal of the uterus (hysterectomy), makes it more likely that the other organs, such as the bladder or large intestine (colon), will move out of position. Surgery on the back or spinal cord can damage the nerves that are involved with the proper function of the intestines. Pressure on the intestines. Common causes of intestinal pressure include frequent straining during bowel

  7. Rectal Prolapse - Topic Overview

    What is rectal prolapse? Rectal prolapse occurs when part or all of the wall of the rectum slides out of place,sometimes sticking out of the anus. See a picture of rectal prolapse. There are three types of rectal prolapse. Partial prolapse (also called mucosal prolapse). The lining (mucous membrane) of the rectum slides out of place and usually sticks out of the anus. This can happen when ...

  8. Rectal Prolapse Surgery - Topic Overview

    Surgeons can repair a complete rectal prolapse. They make a cut through the abdomen or the perineum. In abdominal surgery, the surgeon makes a cut in the abdomen. He or she may secure part of the large intestine or the rectum, or both, to the inside of the abdominal cavity with sutures or a piece of mesh (rectopexy). This surgery can restore a natural shape to the large intestine. The surgeon may also remove part of the large intestine and sew the ends together. Other conditions that may be present (such as a rectocele or prolapsed uterus) can also be repaired. Depending on the type of problems present, the surgeon may make a large, single cut (open surgery) or may make several small cuts along with using an instrument with a small camera that allows the surgeon to see inside the body (laparoscopic surgery). Rectal prolapse will come back in fewer than 1 out of 10 people who have this surgery.1In perineal surgery, the surgeon goes through the perineum or anus. The surgeon can place a

  9. C. diff

    Learn more from WebMD about C. diff infection, including symptoms, risk factors, treatment, and prevention.

  10. Causes of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Learn about about the causes of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

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