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    Sclerosing Mesenteritis

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Sclerosing Mesenteritis is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    • mesenteric panniculitis
    • retractile mesenteritis
    • mesenteric lipodystrophy

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Summary
    Sclerosing mesenteritis is a rare spectrum of disease characterized by degeneration (necrosis), inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) of fatty (adipose) tissue of the mesentery. The mesentery is a fold of tissue of the peritoneum that supports and attaches the intestines to the wall of the abdomen. The peritoneum is the membrane that lines the abdominal cavity and covers the abdominal organs. The small bowel mesentery is most often affected. The symptoms of sclerosing mesenteritis can vary greatly from one person to another and can include a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea/vomiting, bloating, loss of appetite and diarrhea or constipation. Non-gastrointestinal symptoms include fatigue, weight loss, night sweats and fever. Some individuals do not develop any noticeable symptoms (asymptomatic). The exact cause of sclerosing mesenteritis is unknown.

    Introduction
    Sclerosing mesenteritis was first described in the medical literature in 1924 as retractile mesenteritis. Since that time numerous, varied names have been used to describe the condition. Three prominent names that have been used in the literature are retractile mesenteritis, mesenteric panniculitis, and mesenteric lipodystrohpy. These three names denote the predominant feature in a particular case. Sclerosing mesenteritis or retractile mesenteritis refers to a predominance of fibrosis; mesenteric panniculitis refers to a predominance of inflammation; and mesenteric lipodystrophy refers to a predominance fat necrosis. Because of the presence of some degree of fibrosis, many physicians advocate sclerosing mesenteritis as the best name for this spectrum of disease.

    Additional names that have been used for this disorder include mesenteric fibrosis, mesenteric sclerosis, liposclerotic mesenteritis, mesenteric Pfeifer-Weber-Christian disease, mesenteric lipogranuloma, and xanthogranulomatous mesenteritis.

    Resources

    Digestive Disease National Coalition
    507 Capitol Court, NE
    Suite 200
    Washington, DC 20002
    Tel: (202)544-7497
    Fax: (202)546-7105
    Email: ddnc@hmcw.org
    Internet: http://www.ddnc.org

    NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive & Kidney Diseases
    Office of Communications & Public Liaison
    Bldg 31, Rm 9A06
    31 Center Drive, MSC 2560
    Bethesda, MD 20892-2560
    Tel: (301)496-3583
    Email: NDDIC@info.niddk.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    International Mesenteric Panniculitis Society
    Email: milliemoos531@yahoo.com
    Internet: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/InternationalMesentericPanniculitisSociety/

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 12/18/2011
    Copyright 1988, 1989, 2000, 2011 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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