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Understanding Diverticulitis -- Causes and Treatment

What Are the Treatments for Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis? continued...

If you have several attacks of acute diverticulitis, your doctor may want to remove the affected section of the intestine when you are free of symptoms. You may also need surgery if intravenous therapy does not effectively treat an acute attack of diverticulitis. Whatever the treatment, the chances for a full recovery are very good if you receive prompt medical attention.

You should drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water daily to prevent constipation. If you do become constipated, prunes or prune juice may serve as natural laxatives. Follow a low-fat diet; fat slows down the passage of food through the intestine. Get yourself tested for food allergies to identify foods that irritate your system so that you can avoid them.

During acute attacks of diverticulitis, eat low-bulk foods (broths and low-fiber breads) while diverticula are inflamed and sensitive, and make the following foods a significant part of your diet: cooked vegetables, cooked fruits, and apples -- all of which will be soothing to the inflamed intestine. Avoid milk and milk products (yogurts and cheeses), which could worsen your illness, especially if you have diarrhea.

 

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WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by David T. Derrer, MD on March 30, 2014

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