Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier
WebMD

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started
My Medicine
WebMD

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion
    WebMD

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community
    WebMD

    Community

    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Font Size
A
A
A

Understanding Ulcer Treatment

What Are the Treatments for an Ulcer? continued...

The chief goals of treatment are reducing the amount of acid in the stomach, strengthening the protective linings that come in direct contact with gastric acids, and -- if your ulcer is caused by bacterial infection -- treating the H. pylori infection with medication. Your doctor will likely prescribe triple therapy which is a combination of antibiotics, such as amoxicillin and clarithromycin, along with a proton pump inhibitor, such as omeprazole (Prilosec) or esomeprazole (Nexium). Metronidazole (Flagyl) can be substituted for amoxicillin in patients who are allergic to penicillin. In  patients who have been repeatedly exposed to these antibiotics, or in areas where there is resistance to clarithromycin or metronidazole, quadruple therapy with bismuth (Pepto-Bismol), a proton-pump inhibitor, and 2 antibiotics (like metronidazole and tetracycline) is more effective. Regardless of the regimen, all medications should be taken for 10-14 days.

Surgical treatment of peptic ulcers is reserved for ulcer disease unresponsive to medical management or emergency treatment of complications, such as bleeding. If your ulcer is hemorrhaging, the surgeon will identify the source of the bleeding (usually a small artery at the base of the ulcer) and repair it. Perforated ulcers -- holes in the entire stomach or duodenal wall -- must be surgically closed. This is an emergent procedure.

In some cases, an elective surgery to decrease stomach acid secretion may be necessary. However, you should have an in-depth discussion with your doctor as there are many potential complications associated with the procedures, including ulcer recurrence, liver complications, and ''dumping syndrome,'' which causes chronic abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and/or sweating after eating.

Tips for Living With Ulcers

  • If you have an ulcer, be cautious when choosing over-the-counter pain relievers. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen may not only irritate the ulcer but also prevent a bleeding ulcer from healing. Avoid powdered headache medication as well, which usually contain powdered aspirin. Your best choice may be acetaminophen, which does not cause or promote stomach ulcers.
  • Don't overdose on iron supplements. Although people with bleeding ulcers can develop anemia and may need to take iron as a treatment, taking too much can irritate the stomach lining and the ulcer. Ask your doctor how much iron you need.
  • Learn how to deal with stress. Practicing relaxation techniques -- including deep breathing, guided imagery, and moderate exercise -- can help alleviate stress and promote healing.

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Lisa B. Bernstein, MD on March 18, 2015
1 | 2

Today on WebMD

man holding his stomach
Get the facts on common problems.
blueberries in a palm
Best and worst foods.
 
woman shopping
Learn what foods to avoid.
fresh and dried plums
Will it help constipation?
 
diverticuliltis illustration
Slideshow
couple eating at cafe
Article
 
sick child
Slideshow
Woman blowing bubble gum
Slideshow
 

Send yourself a link to download the app.

Loading ...

Please wait...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

Woman with crohns in pain
Slideshow
Woman with stomach pain
Slideshow
 
diet for diverticulitis
Video
what causes diarrhea
Video