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indinavir

Interactions

Atazanavir/Indinavir

This information is generalized and not intended as specific medical advice. Consult your healthcare professional before taking or discontinuing any drug or commencing any course of treatment.

Medical warning:

Severe. These medicines may interact and cause very harmful effects and are usually not taken together. Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) for more information.

How the interaction occurs:

Both atazanavir and indinavir can increase the amount of bilirubin in your blood.

What might happen:

Your skin and the whites of your eyes may turn yellow. You may have abdominal pain.

What you should do about this interaction:

Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) right away about using these medicines together. Your doctor may want to run some blood test on you. Let your doctor know if you have any yellowing of the eyes or skin or any abdominal pain.Your healthcare professionals may already be aware of this interaction and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first.

References:

1.Reyataz (atazanavir sulfate) US prescribing information. Bristol-Myers Squibb Company August, 2013.

2.Reyataz (atazanavir sulfate) Australian product information. Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceuticals January 8, 2004.

3.Crixivan (indinavir sulfate) US prescribing information. Merck & Co., Inc. February, 2011.

4.Wensing AM, van Maarseveen NM, Nijhuis M. Fifteen years of HIV Protease Inhibitors: raising the barrier to resistance. Antiviral Res 2010 Jan; 85(1):59-74.

5.Zucker SD, Qin X, Rouster SD, Yu F, Green RM, Keshavan P, Feinberg J, Sherman KE. Mechanism of indinavir-induced hyperbilirubinemia. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2001 Oct 23;98(22):12671-6.

6.Sulkowski MS. Drug-induced liver injury associated with antiretroviral therapy that includes HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Clin Infect Dis 2004 Mar 1;38 Suppl 2:S90-7.

7.Bosma PJ, Chowdhury JR, Bakker C, Gantla S, de Boer A, Oostra BA, Lindhout D, Tytgat GN, Jansen PL, Oude Elferink RP, et al. The genetic basis of the reduced expression of bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 in Gilbert's syndrome. N Engl J Med 1995 Nov 2;333(18):1171-5.

8.Rotger M, Taffe P, Bleiber G, Gunthard HF, Furrer H, Vernazza P, Drechsler H, Bernasconi E, Rickenbach M, Telenti A. Gilbert syndrome and the development of antiretroviral therapy-associated hyperbilirubinemia. J Infect Dis 2005 Oct 15;192(8):1381-6.

Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, expect as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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