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Lopid oral

Selected HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/Gemfibrozil

This information is generalized and not intended as specific medical advice. Consult your healthcare professional before taking or discontinuing any drug or commencing any course of treatment.

Medical warning:

Severe. These medicines may interact and cause very harmful effects and are usually not taken together. Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) for more information.

How the interaction occurs:

The cause of the interaction is not known.

What might happen:

You may experience an increased risk of severe muscle pain, flu-like symptoms, and sudden decrease in the amount of urine.

What you should do about this interaction:

Contact your healthcare professionals (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) as soon as possible about taking these two medicines together. This interaction may be worse if you currently have any type of kidney problem. Tell your doctor right away if you experience muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness; unexplained tiredness; or discolored urine.Your healthcare professionals may already be aware of this drug interaction and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first.

References:

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