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aluminum-magnesium hydroxide oral

Tetracyclines/Divalent & Trivalent Cations

This information is generalized and not intended as specific medical advice. Consult your healthcare professional before taking or discontinuing any drug or commencing any course of treatment.

Medical warning:

Serious. These medicines may interact and cause very harmful effects. Contact your healthcare professional (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) for more information.

How the interaction occurs:

When these two medicines are taken together, your body may not process your antibiotic properly.

What might happen:

Your blood levels of antibiotic may decrease and reduce the ability of the medicine to treat your infection.

What you should do about this interaction:

Contact your healthcare professionals (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) as soon as possible about taking these two medicines together. They may already be aware of this drug interaction and may be monitoring you for it. If your doctor prescribes these medicines together, take them at least two hours apart. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first.

References:

1.Albert A, Rees CW. Avidity of the tetracyclines for the cations of metal. Nature 1956 Mar 3;177(4505):433-4.
2.Chin TF, Lach JL. Drug diffusion and bioavailability: tetracycline metallic chelation. Am J Hosp Pharm 1975 Jun;32(6):625-9.
3.Penttila O, Hurme H, Neuvonen PJ. Effect of zinc sulphate on the absorption of tetracycline and doxycycline in man. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 1975 Dec 19;9(2-3):131-4.
4.Khalil SA, Daabis NA, Naggar VF, Wafik M. Effect of magnesium trisilicate and citric acid on the biovailability of tetracycline in man. Pharmazie 1977 Aug-Sep;32(8-9):519-22.
5.Mapp RK, McCarthy TJ. The effect of zinc sulphate and of bicitropeptide on tetracycline absorption. S Afr Med J 1976 Oct 12;50(45):1829-30.
6.Garty M, Hurwitz A. Effect of cimetidine and antacids on gastrointestinal absorption of tetracycline. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1980 Aug;28(2):203-7.
7.Healy DP, Dansereau RJ, Dunn AB, Clendening CE, Mounts AW, Deepe GS Jr. Reduced tetracycline bioavailability caused by magnesium aluminum silicate in liquid formulations of bismuth subsalicylate. Ann Pharmacother 1997 Dec;31(12):1460-4.
8.Scheiner J, Altemeier WA. Experimental study of factors inhibiting absorption and effective therapeutic levels of declomycin. Surg Gynecol Obstet 1962 Jan;114:9-14.
9.Rosenblatt JE, Barrett JE, Brodie JL, Kirby WM. Comparison of in vitro activity and clinical pharmacology of doxycycline with other tetracyclines. Antimicrobial Agents Chemother 1966;6:134-41.
10.Mattila MJ, Neuvonen PJ, Gothoni G, Hackman CR. Interference of iron preparations and milk with the absorption of tetracyclines. Excerpta Medica Int Cong Ser 1972;254:128-33.
11.Waisbren BA, Hueckel JS. Reduced absorption of aureomycin caused by aluminum hydroxide gel (Amphojel). Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1950;73:73-4.
12.Boger WP, Gavin JJ. An evaluation of tetracycline preparations. N Engl J Med 1959 Oct 22;261(17):827-32.
13.Nguyen VX, Nix DE, Gillikin S, Schentag JJ. Effect of oral antacid administration on the pharmacokinetics of intravenous doxycycline. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1989 Apr;33(4):434-6.
14.Deppermann KM, Lode H, Hoffken G, Tschink G, Kalz C, Koeppe P. Influence of ranitidine, pirenzepine, and aluminum magnesium hydroxide on the bioavailability of various antibiotics, including amoxicillin, cephalexin, doxycycline, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1989 Nov;33(11):1901-7.
15.Minocin (minocycline hydrochloride oral suspension) US prescribing information. Triax Pharmaceuticals LLC August, 2010.
16.Ericsson CD, Feldman S, Pickering LK, Cleary TG. Influence of subsalicylate bismuth on absorption of doxycycline. JAMA 1982 Apr 23; 247(16):2266-7.
17.Albert KS, Welch RD, DeSante KA, DiSanto AR. Decreased tetracycline bioavailability caused by a bismuth subsalicylate antidiarrheal mixture. J Pharm Sci 1979 May;68(5):586-8.
18.Yokel RA, Dickey KM, Goldberg AH. Selective adherence of a sucralfate-tetracycline complex to gastric ulcers: implications for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori. Biopharm Drug Dispos 1995 Aug; 16(6):475-9.
19.Accupril (quinapril) US prescribing information. Pfizer October, 2013.
20.Fosrenol (lanthanum carbonate) Canadian prescribing information. Shire BioChem February 19, 2007.

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