Skip to content

Deep Vein Thrombosis Health Center

Study Casts Doubt on Costly Treatment for Leg Clots

Catheter-directed thrombolysis may carry higher risk of bleeding than conventional treatment, researchers say
Font Size
A
A
A

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Two treatments that break up blood clots deep in the veins of the legs appear no different in terms of death risk. However, one results in a greater risk of bleeding and average hospitalization bills that are three times the cost of the other treatment, a new study finds.

The standard treatment for these clots -- known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) -- is blood-thinning medications and compression stockings. The other, more expensive treatment delivers medication directly to the clot to dissolve it. This procedure, called catheter-directed thrombolysis, has increased in use in recent years despite inconclusive research as to its safety, the study authors said.

"DVT is a very common disease that occurs in about one in 1,000 people per year," said lead researcher Dr. Riyaz Bashir, an associate professor of medicine at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

"This condition is responsible for more than 600,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States, and approximately 6 percent of these patients will die within one month of the diagnosis," he said.

About 20 percent to 50 percent of people with deep vein thrombosis develop a serious complication called post-thrombotic syndrome, despite conventional treatment with blood-thinning medications and compression stockings, Bashir said. The patients experience chronic leg pains, swelling, skin discoloration and ulcers.

"Many of these people lose their jobs because of the disability it causes," Bashir added.

Dr. Gregg Fonarow, a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles, said several small studies have suggested that use of catheter-directed thrombolysis may lead to a decrease in risk for post-thrombotic syndrome.

"However, none of these studies have been definitive," Fonarow said. "Guideline recommendations regarding catheter-delivered thrombolysis are mixed, and use in clinical practice is modest and varies substantially by hospital," he added.

For the new study, published online July 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine, Bashir's team collected data on more than 90,600 patients hospitalized for deep vein thrombosis from 2005 through 2010.

About 4 percent of these patients underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis and also received blood-thinning drugs, the researchers found.

Today on WebMD

TAG dvt blood clot
Symptoms, causes, risk factors, and more.
businesswoman in airport
Tips to prevent another clot.
 
blood thinners
Tips for DVT.
Blood clots in artery
Causes and treatments.
 
Simple Steps to Lower Cholesterol
Slideshow
Having Surgery Tips To Reduce DVT Risk And More
Slideshow
 
New DVT Therapies On The Horizon
Video
Atrial Fibrillation Guide
Slideshow
 

WebMD Special Sections