0 0
  • Question 1/8

    You can get deep vein thrombosis (DVT) from sitting on an airplane for too long.

  • Answer 1/8

    You can get deep vein thrombosis (DVT) from sitting on an airplane for too long.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in a muscle. If you sit in a small space for a long time -- more than 4 hours -- you can get one. Take some simple steps to lower your chances of DVT when you buckle up for a long-distance trip: Drink lots of water, wear loose clothing, and get up often to walk around and stretch. If you’re at risk for blood clots, ask your doctor if you should take an aspirin before you travel.

  • Question 1/8

    DVT usually happens in this part of your body:

  • Answer 1/8

    DVT usually happens in this part of your body:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most of these clots are in the lower legs or thighs. But you can get them in your arm, pelvis, or other large veins. They can form if your blood moves too slowly, if a vein is damaged, or if there’s a problem with your blood.

  • Question 1/8

    You can have DVT without knowing it.

  • Answer 1/8

    You can have DVT without knowing it.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    About half the people with it have no symptoms. Call your doctor right away if one or both your legs are swollen, or if one leg hurts or is tender. Check and see if your legs are the same size. If one is bigger, this could be due to a clot. Another sign of DVT? If the skin in one of your legs feels warm or looks red or discolored.

  • Question 1/8

    DVT causes strokes.

  • Answer 1/8

    DVT causes strokes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There are two main kinds of clots: Those that form deep in your veins and those that show up in your arteries. The ones in the arteries can cause heart attacks and strokes. DVT clots don’t, but they can be dangerous. They can move through your blood and block a blood vessel in your lungs. That’s called a pulmonary embolism, and you can die from it, so it’s important to get treatment right away.

  • Question 1/8

    After surgery, your chances of DVT are highest:

  • Answer 1/8

    After surgery, your chances of DVT are highest:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It can happen after leg or hip surgery. That’s because the operation affects how your blood flows and clots. You’re at greatest risk for DVT for up to 10 days after. But don’t worry. Your doctor will tell you how to prevent it. He may suggest you move around as soon as you can. Or he’ll give you medicines to help your blood move. He might also give you compression stockings, which help with blood flow.

  • Question 1/8

    Blood thinners make clots go away.

  • Answer 1/8

    Blood thinners make clots go away.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you have DVT, there’s a good chance your doctor will give you these meds. They stop clots from getting bigger and keep them from moving. They also keep clots from forming. But they don’t break them up. Most people will get better with blood thinners and stockings that help with swelling and blood flow. Over time, the clots will dissolve and disappear.

  • Question 1/8

    If you stay at a healthy weight, you’ll lower your chances of DVT.

  • Answer 1/8

    If you stay at a healthy weight, you’ll lower your chances of DVT.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Here’s another reason to shed those extra pounds: Obesity increases your odds of DVT. It’s better to prevent it than to treat it. If you're not active now, ask your doctor how to start an exercise program. If you smoke, ask for help kicking the habit. Get up often from your chair at work and at home, too. And take short walks. They work the leg muscles that help pump blood back toward your heart.

  • Question 1/8

    Who’s most likely to get DVT?

  • Answer 1/8

    Who’s most likely to get DVT?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Guys over 50 are the most likely. Women have a higher risk of blood clots when they’re pregnant or on the pill.

  • Your Score:

    Share your score:
    0
    Share your score:
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Well done! You know the ABCs of DVT.

    Results:

    Pretty good! You know how to separate facts from fiction when it comes to DVT.

    Results:

    Not bad, but you can do better. Study up on DVT and take the quiz again for a healthier result.

    Next
    Next Quiz:

    Rheumatoid Arthritis Myths and Facts

    Retake Quiz

Sources | Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum, MD on December 17, 2015 Medically Reviewed on December 17, 2015

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum, MD on
December 17, 2015

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Getty

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

American Society of Hematology: “Blood Clots,” “Myths and Facts.”

CDC: “Blood Clots and Travel: What You Need to Know,” “Venous Thromboembolism (Blood Clots)”

Cleveland Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)”

Familydoctor.org: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Harvard Medical School: “Leg clots (aka deep-vein thrombosis): an immediate and long-term health hazard.”  

National Center for Biotechnology Information: “The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism.”

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “What is Deep Vein Thrombosis?”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.