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Epilepsy Health Center

How to Handle a Chronic Illness at Work

Whether it's epilepsy or peanut allergies here are some tips on who to tell, what your employer needs to know, and what people should do in case of an emergency.
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WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

When you have a chronic illness, such as epilepsy, peanut allergies, or diabetes, you need an ally at your place of work.

Who should that ally be, how does he need to handle himself, and what should he do in case of an emergency? Here are some practical tips experts offer WebMD that will help you balance your health with your career.

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Living With a Chronic Illness: Who Needs to Know

"Start by talking to your doctor," says Susan Kerner, director of the Employee Assistance Program for Southern NH Health System in Nashua, N.H. "Your doctor can help you better understand and articulate what your symptoms are, how severe they are, and exactly what you need to be prepared for."

Next, find out if the company you work for has a corporate or employee health department.

"It's sometimes helpful to talk to an occupational health or corporate health representative who can give you words of wisdom," says Kerner. "They are experienced in areas such as helping employees deal with issues like these in the workplace."

You should also ask yourself if your chronic illness will require certain accommodations, like a different work schedule because of medications, or frequent breaks. If that is the case, then a discussion with human resources is warranted.

"Talk to someone from human resources about your health needs at work, especially if you need them to be aware of certain issues that might impact your work schedule," says Kerner.

Then, it's time to talk to the people you spend eight or more hours a day with, and help them better understand how they can help with your chronic illness.

"You need to tell the people who work physically near you, as well as your manager, so practically, if there is an emergency, they can handle the situation," says Kerner.

So what, exactly, do they need to understand about your chronic illness in case of an emergency?

Your Chronic Illness: What They Need to Know

"Be realistic about what they need to know," says Kerner. "Make people aware while not creating excessive concern, and alleviate their fears about what to do when something happens."

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