Skip to content

Epilepsy Health Center

Select An Article

Women and Epilepsy

    Font Size

    You could say that epilepsy doesn't discriminate. It strikes men and women at about the same rate. Men are slightly more likely to develop it than women. But that doesn't mean that it always affects men and women in the same way. Women definitely have special issues they need to understand and prepare for.

    About one million women and girls are living with epilepsy and other seizure disorders today. If you're one of them, you know that there are things that men and boys with epilepsy don't have to worry about. For example, you might notice that you have more seizures around the time of your menstrual cycle and want to know why. You may be wondering whether it's safe to get pregnant. You may question if it's safe to take epilepsy drugs during pregnancy.

    Recommended Related to Epilepsy

    Epilepsy and Your Child's School

    Going to school can be stressful for children with epilepsy. They may worry about having a seizure in class or how other students will react. Parents are also anxious. They often worry that their child's teacher may not know how to handle an epileptic seizure, or that their child may be treated unfairly because of epilepsy. In many cases, these fears turn out to be unfounded. Parents should know that epilepsy isn't that uncommon. There's a good chance that yours won't be the first child with epilepsy...

    Read the Epilepsy and Your Child's School article > >

    You're not alone. About 200,000 new cases of seizures and epilepsy occur each year. And the particular issues affecting women and girls are so important that the Epilepsy Foundation created a special initiative on Women and Epilepsy.

    Doctors don't have all the answers for women with epilepsy. But a lot more research is being done and they are learning more every day. There are now more treatment options than ever.

    Here are some of the things you might want to ask your doctor about to understand how your epilepsy can affect your life and how to manage it:

    • What birth control should I use if I have seizures?
    • Can epilepsy affect my fertility?
    • Is it safe for me to get pregnant?
    • Are my children at risk for developing epilepsy?
    • What should I do to prepare for being a parent?
    • How do my periods and hormones affect my epilepsy?
    • What will happen when I go through menopause?

    It's important to know that epilepsy can usually be controlled. It typically doesn't get worse with time. Approximately 80% of people with epilepsy can be significantly helped by modern therapies, and some may go months or years between seizures. However, 10% of new patients fail to gain control of seizures despite following their prescribed treatments. But, with the help of a knowledgeable doctor, women today can manage their epilepsy and have active, healthy lives. And seizures may decrease as women get older.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Neil Lava, MD on March 18, 2013
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    human head and brain waves
    Causes, symptoms, and treatments.
    Grand mal seizure
    How is each one different?
     
    marijuana plant
    CBD, a plant chemical, may cut down seizures.
    prescription bottle
    Which medication is right for you?
     
    Seizures Driving
    Article
    Questions for Doctor Epilepsy
    Article
     
    Pills spilling from bottle in front of clock
    Article
    Graces Magic Diet
    VIDEO
     
    Pets Improve Your Health
    SLIDESHOW
    Caring Child Epilepsy
    Article
     
    Making Home Safe
    Article
    Epilepsy Surgery Cure
    VIDEO