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    Epilepsy Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

    1. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - What Increases Your Risk

      The risk of developing epilepsy increases if you have family history of epilepsy or a head injury with loss of consciousness or amnesia for more than 24 hours.

    2. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Imaging tests, such as MRI or CT scan, are often done after a first seizure. And they are recommended in other situations. An MRI or CT scan may be done immediately if you had a seizure along with confusion or new motor or sensory problems that did not improve soon after the seizure ended. Ongoing headache or fever, AIDS, recent head trauma, cancer, or anticoagulant therapy also increases the likelihood that the seizure was related to a serious brain problem. The nature of the seizure and your age can also help determine whether an imaging test is needed.Imaging tests may be used before epilepsy surgery to find the exact location of a problem in the brain. Because scans are able to detect brain lesions, they can also be helpful in deciding whether it is safe to stop treatment with medicine. The presence of lesions increases your risk of having seizures if you stop taking medicine.

    3. Epilepsy - Treatment Overview

      Treatment can reduce or prevent seizures in most people who have epilepsy, which can improve the quality of your life. Controlling your epilepsy also lowers the risk of falling and other accidents that can happen when you have a seizure.

    4. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      An epileptic seizure or convulsion can be terrifying. A seizure temporarily interferes with muscle control, movement, speech, vision, or awareness. It may cause a person's entire body to shake violently for a few seconds to a few minutes, and he or she may lose consciousness.Seizures can be mild to severe, and they affect people differently. Even though you may feel helpless around someone having

    5. Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      While working with your doctor to plan a medicine routine for yourself or your child,it may help you to talk about some of the choices and issues involved. Some of the following questions might help you prepare. How often will I or my child have to take the medicine? Some medicines for epilepsy have to be taken several times a day. This is sometimes hard for children in school; people with ...

    6. Epilepsy - What Happens

      Although epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders involving the nervous system, experts often cannot explain exactly how or why the disease develops and how or why the abnormal electrical activity in the brain occurs.

    7. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Childhood absence epilepsy develops between ages 4 and 10. It causes very brief absence seizures that may include staring into space, eye fluttering, and slight muscle jerks. Juvenile absence epilepsy develops between ages 10 and 17 and causes similar seizures. Many children with juvenile absence epilepsy have generalized tonic-clonic seizures as well.Both childhood and juvenile absence epilepsy tend to run in families. These types of epilepsy usually respond well to drug therapy.

    8. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Epilepsy that causes generalized seizures is more common in children than in adults. Unlike partial seizures, which begin in a specific, often damaged area in the brain, generalized seizures cannot be traced to a specific location or focus. The abnormal electrical activity that causes seizures begins over the entire surface of the brain. And these seizures tend to affect the entire body.Epilepsy that causes generalized seizures may have no known cause (idiopathic), or it may result from another condition (symptomatic). Drug therapy is the usual treatment approach. But surgery may be helpful in some cases.

    9. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      If you have seizures that alter your awareness, consciousness, or muscle control, you may not have the legal right to drive.Laws vary from state to state, but in many cases you have to be seizure-free for at least 6 months to 1 year before you can get a driver's license.The laws of the state you live in, not your doctor, decide whether or not you have the right to drive. You can find out about the law in your state by visiting the Epilepsy Foundation website at www.epilepsyfoundation.org/resources/drivingandtravel.cfmBefore getting a license, you may have to show proof from your doctor that you are receiving treatment and that the treatment has brought your seizures under control. (Remember, too, that some drugs used to control epilepsy may make you drowsy. If you have just started a new drug, don't drive until you know how the drug will affect you.)In general, the risk of having a seizure-related traffic accident is greatly reduced in people who have been seizure-free for 1 year.

    10. Epilepsy - Other Treatment

      For many years, antiepileptic medication was the only treatment for people with epilepsy. This is still true for many people, although surgery is now an option for some.

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