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Epilepsy Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

  1. Epilepsy and Driving - Topic Overview

    Simple partial seizures occur in children and adults with some forms of epilepsy. They are about half as common as complex partial seizures. The person stays awake and aware during the seizure. The seizure may be only a strange smell or taste, sound or visual disturbance, or feeling of confusion, anxiety, or fear—some people describe these sensations as an aura. The person's arms, face, or hands may briefly stiffen, tingle, flex, or jerk, but this does not always occur. Eyes may blink rapidly during the seizure. The person may cry out or may not be able to speak.Simple partial seizures affect only those muscles or body parts controlled by the specific area of the brain where the seizure begins. After the seizure, the person may feel weak or numb in that area of his or her body (often one side of the face, one hand, or one arm).

  2. Epilepsy and Driving - Topic Overview

    People with nonepileptic seizures (NES) have periods of seizure-like activity. NES are characterized by a loss of or change in physical function without a central nervous system problem. The loss or change causes periods of physical activity or inactivity that resemble epileptic seizures. A person can have both nonepileptic and epileptic seizures. NES are usually related to a mental health ...

  3. Epilepsy and Driving - Topic Overview

    After you have had a seizure,it can be difficult to predict whether you will have more seizures. This makes it hard to decide whether to begin treatment for epilepsy. The first seizure you report may not actually be the first seizure you've had. You may have had seizures in the past,such as brief absence seizures or auras,without knowing they were seizures. Doing an electroencephalogram ...

  4. Epilepsy and Driving - Treatment Overview

    Treatment can reduce or prevent seizures in most people who have epilepsy, which can improve the quality of your life. Controlling your epilepsy also lowers the risk of falling and other accidents that can happen when you have a seizure.

  5. Epilepsy and Driving - Medications

    Medications to prevent epileptic seizures are called antiepileptics. The goal is to find an effective antiepileptic medication that causes the fewest side effects. Antiepileptic medications prevent seizures in 60% to 70% of people who take them. Although

  6. Epilepsy and Driving - Surgery

    Surgery can greatly improve the lives of some people with epilepsy. While medication is the most common approach to treating epilepsy, it does not always work.

  7. Epilepsy and Driving - Home Treatment

    Controlling seizures caused by epilepsy requires a daily commitment to following your treatment plan. If you are using antiepileptic medication, you must take your medication exactly as prescribed. Not following the treatment plan is one of the main reaso

  8. Epilepsy and Driving - Topic Overview

    Myoclonic seizures affect a small number of children and adults with generalized epilepsy of unknown cause (idiopathic). In children and teens with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, the seizures seem to occur most often after waking up or while falling asleep.During a myoclonic seizure:The arms, legs, torso, or facial muscles jerk rapidly as though they are being shocked.The body may jerk once or many times, on one or both sides of the body, in a rhythmic or random pattern.The person usually does not lose consciousness.Myoclonic seizures are almost always very brief.

  9. Epilepsy and Driving - Health Tools

    This health tool will help you make wise health decisions or take action regarding epilepsy.

  10. Epilepsy and Driving - Topic Overview

    An epileptic seizure or convulsion can be terrifying. A seizure temporarily interferes with muscle control, movement, speech, vision, or awareness. It may cause a person's entire body to shake violently for a few seconds to a few minutes, and he or she may lose consciousness.Seizures can be mild to severe, and they affect people differently. Even though you may feel helpless around someone having

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