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Epilepsy Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

  1. Nonepileptic Seizures (NES) - Topic Overview

    People with nonepileptic seizures (NES) have periods of seizure-like activity. NES are characterized by a loss of or change in physical function without a central nervous system problem. The loss or change causes periods of physical activity or inactivity that resemble epileptic seizures. A person can have both nonepileptic and epileptic seizures. NES are usually related to a mental health ...

  2. Epilepsy - Treatment Overview

    Treatment can reduce or prevent seizures in most people who have epilepsy, which can improve the quality of your life. Controlling your epilepsy also lowers the risk of falling and other accidents that can happen when you have a seizure.

  3. Epilepsy: Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    Generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures are the easiest seizures to recognize. They happen most often in people with generalized epilepsy of unknown cause.A generalized tonic-clonic seizure begins with a sudden loss of consciousness. During the first 15 to 30 seconds of the seizure, the entire body stiffens as the muscles contract. The back and neck are arched. Sometimes the person may cry out as the vocal cords contract and air is released from the lungs. The person may turn blue because he or she isn't breathing. This is the tonic phase of the seizure.During the next 30 to 45 seconds, the muscles jerk (convulse) in a rhythmic pattern. This is the clonic phase of the seizure. While the muscles are jerking, the person may bite his or her tongue or lose bladder or bowel control.An entire seizure lasts 1 to 2 minutes. After the seizure, the person will be unresponsive at first but will gradually wake up in 10 to 30 minutes. The person may be sleepy, confused, or dazed. The person

  4. Tips for Parents of Children With Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    If your child has epilepsy,there are many ways to lower his or her risk of injury and avoid embarrassment sometimes caused by seizures: Use padded side rails and waterproof pads on cribs and beds. Use car seats and seat belts,and have your child wear a helmet when biking,skiing,or skating. Do not let your child swim alone. If you have a young child,do not leave him or her alone in the ...

  5. Epilepsy - When To Call a Doctor

    Seizures do not always require urgent care. However, call 911 or other emergency services immediately if the person having a seizure stops breathing for longer than 30 seconds. After calling or other emergency services, begin rescue breathing.

  6. Epilepsy - Cause

    Learn about causes of epilepsy, including tumor, infection, or damage to the brain.

  7. Helping a Person During a Seizure - Topic Overview

    An epileptic seizure or convulsion can be terrifying. A seizure temporarily interferes with muscle control, movement, speech, vision, or awareness. It may cause a person's entire body to shake violently for a few seconds to a few minutes, and he or she may lose consciousness.Seizures can be mild to severe, and they affect people differently. Even though you may feel helpless around someone having

  8. Diagnosing Epilepsy: EEG's Limits - Topic Overview

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to be the most useful test in confirming a diagnosis of epilepsy, but it is not foolproof. Some people with abnormal EEG results do not have epilepsy. This is not common.About 50% of people with epilepsy will have normal results on their first EEG.1 If epilepsy is still suspected, a follow-up EEG may be done. This second test may be a sleep-deprived EEG, in which the test is done after you have been forced to stay awake for a longer period of time than usual. A sleep-deprived EEG can sometimes reveal abnormalities that did not show up on the regular EEG.From 10% to 40% of people with epilepsy will have normal EEG results even after having several EEG tests done.1Video and EEG monitoring records seizures on videotape and computer so that the doctor can see what happens just before, during, and right after a seizure occurs. The video records what you are doing while the EEG records the electrical activity occurring in your brain. This type of

  9. Evaluation and Treatment After a First Seizure - Topic Overview

    After you have had a seizure,it can be difficult to predict whether you will have more seizures. This makes it hard to decide whether to begin treatment for epilepsy. The first seizure you report may not actually be the first seizure you've had. You may have had seizures in the past,such as brief absence seizures or auras,without knowing they were seizures. Doing an electroencephalogram ...

  10. Hemispherectomy for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    The left and right sides of the brain are called hemispheres. Hemispherectomy is the removal of one side of the brain. This procedure is sometimes done on children who have severe forms of epilepsy, such as Rasmussen syndrome and Sturge-Weber disease. These conditions badly damage one side of the brain, cause frequent seizures and problems with physical and mental development. And these conditions do not respond well to drug treatment.Hemispherectomy may completely prevent seizures and reverse delays in development that occur with some forms of epilepsy.The surgery always causes some loss of movement and sensation on one side of the body and sometimes causes partial loss of vision in half of the visual field of each eye. But most children with a large epileptic area on one side of the brain already have these problems before the surgery.

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