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    Epilepsy Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

    1. Epilepsy - Other Treatment

      For many years, antiepileptic medication was the only treatment for people with epilepsy. This is still true for many people, although surgery is now an option for some.

    2. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Complex partial seizures occur in children and adults with certain forms of epilepsy. They are the most common type of seizure in adults.An aura may occur at the beginning of a seizure. It may consist of a strange smell, taste, sound, or visual disturbance, an unexplained feeling of fear or anxiety, or a sense that everything seems strangely familiar, like it has all happened before (déjà vu), or strangely unfamiliar (jamais vu).The seizure changes the person's level of consciousness. The person may appear awake but cannot respond to anything or anyone around him or her. The person usually stares into space.The seizure may include involuntary movements called automatisms, such as lip-smacking, chewing, hand wringing, picking, and swallowing.The seizure lasts 30 seconds to 2 minutes.Most people who have complex partial seizures do not remember having them. After a seizure, the person will be confused or disoriented and may have a hard time speaking and swallowing for several

    3. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Childhood absence epilepsy develops between ages 4 and 10. It causes very brief absence seizures that may include staring into space, eye fluttering, and slight muscle jerks. Juvenile absence epilepsy develops between ages 10 and 17 and causes similar seizures. Many children with juvenile absence epilepsy have generalized tonic-clonic seizures as well.Both childhood and juvenile absence epilepsy tend to run in families. These types of epilepsy usually respond well to drug therapy.

    4. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Tonic seizures are fairly uncommon. They occur mostly in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This is a severe form of generalized epilepsy that begins in early childhood. (Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also have atonic seizures.)When a tonic seizure occurs, the muscles in the body contract and the entire body stiffens. This occurs suddenly and without warning. And it often causes the person to fall down.People who have tonic or atonic seizures are likely to be injured when they fall. Children may have to wear helmets and restrict their activities to prevent serious injury.

    5. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Epilepsy that causes generalized seizures is more common in children than in adults. Unlike partial seizures, which begin in a specific, often damaged area in the brain, generalized seizures cannot be traced to a specific location or focus. The abnormal electrical activity that causes seizures begins over the entire surface of the brain. And these seizures tend to affect the entire body.Epilepsy that causes generalized seizures may have no known cause (idiopathic), or it may result from another condition (symptomatic). Drug therapy is the usual treatment approach. But surgery may be helpful in some cases.

    6. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - When To Call a Doctor

      Seizures do not always require urgent care. However, call 911 or other emergency services immediately if the person having a seizure stops breathing for longer than 30 seconds. After calling or other emergency services, begin rescue breathing.

    7. Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      While working with your doctor to plan a medicine routine for yourself or your child,it may help you to talk about some of the choices and issues involved. Some of the following questions might help you prepare. How often will I or my child have to take the medicine? Some medicines for epilepsy have to be taken several times a day. This is sometimes hard for children in school; people with ...

    8. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      If your child has epilepsy,there are many ways to lower his or her risk of injury and avoid embarrassment sometimes caused by seizures: Use padded side rails and waterproof pads on cribs and beds. Use car seats and seat belts,and have your child wear a helmet when biking,skiing,or skating. Do not let your child swim alone. If you have a young child,do not leave him or her alone in the ...

    9. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Simple partial seizures occur in children and adults with some forms of epilepsy. They are about half as common as complex partial seizures. The person stays awake and aware during the seizure. The seizure may be only a strange smell or taste, sound or visual disturbance, or feeling of confusion, anxiety, or fear—some people describe these sensations as an aura. The person's arms, face, or hands may briefly stiffen, tingle, flex, or jerk, but this does not always occur. Eyes may blink rapidly during the seizure. The person may cry out or may not be able to speak.Simple partial seizures affect only those muscles or body parts controlled by the specific area of the brain where the seizure begins. After the seizure, the person may feel weak or numb in that area of his or her body (often one side of the face, one hand, or one arm).

    10. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to be the most useful test in confirming a diagnosis of epilepsy, but it is not foolproof. Some people with abnormal EEG results do not have epilepsy. This is not common.About 50% of people with epilepsy will have normal results on their first EEG.1 If epilepsy is still suspected, a follow-up EEG may be done. This second test may be a sleep-deprived EEG, in which the test is done after you have been forced to stay awake for a longer period of time than usual. A sleep-deprived EEG can sometimes reveal abnormalities that did not show up on the regular EEG.From 10% to 40% of people with epilepsy will have normal EEG results even after having several EEG tests done.1Video and EEG monitoring records seizures on videotape and computer so that the doctor can see what happens just before, during, and right after a seizure occurs. The video records what you are doing while the EEG records the electrical activity occurring in your brain. This type of

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