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Epilepsy Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

  1. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    While working with your doctor to plan a medicine routine for yourself or your child,it may help you to talk about some of the choices and issues involved. Some of the following questions might help you prepare. How often will I or my child have to take the medicine? Some medicines for epilepsy have to be taken several times a day. This is sometimes hard for children in school; people with ...

  2. Epilepsy: Atonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    An atonic seizure is a sudden loss of muscle tone in the muscles that hold the body and head upright.The seizure occurs without warning and usually causes the person to fall down.Some atonic seizures may be more limited, only causing the person's head to drop for a moment.Atonic seizures are fairly uncommon and occur mostly in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This is a severe form of generalized epilepsy that begins in early childhood. (Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also have tonic seizures.)People who have atonic or tonic seizures are likely to be injured when they fall. Children may have to wear helmets and restrict their activities to prevent serious injury.

  3. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    Temporal lobe epilepsy involves the portions of the brain that control emotions and memory. The temporal lobes are located on each side of the head just above the ears at the temples. Temporal lobe epilepsy can cause both partial and generalized seizures.Temporal lobe seizures cause behaviors such as smacking of the lips or rubbing the hands together. Other features of the seizures may include emotional or thought disturbances and hallucinations involving sounds, smells, or tastes.Treatment with medicine controls seizures in many people who have temporal lobe epilepsy. A type of brain surgery called anterior temporal lobectomy is another treatment option for people with this type of epilepsy.

  4. Evaluation and Treatment After a First Seizure - Topic Overview

    After you have had a seizure,it can be difficult to predict whether you will have more seizures. This makes it hard to decide whether to begin treatment for epilepsy. The first seizure you report may not actually be the first seizure you've had. You may have had seizures in the past,such as brief absence seizures or auras,without knowing they were seizures. Doing an electroencephalogram ...

  5. Epilepsy: Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    Generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures are the easiest seizures to recognize. They happen most often in people with generalized epilepsy of unknown cause.A generalized tonic-clonic seizure begins with a sudden loss of consciousness. During the first 15 to 30 seconds of the seizure, the entire body stiffens as the muscles contract. The back and neck are arched. Sometimes the person may cry out as the vocal cords contract and air is released from the lungs. The person may turn blue because he or she isn't breathing. This is the tonic phase of the seizure.During the next 30 to 45 seconds, the muscles jerk (convulse) in a rhythmic pattern. This is the clonic phase of the seizure. While the muscles are jerking, the person may bite his or her tongue or lose bladder or bowel control.An entire seizure lasts 1 to 2 minutes. After the seizure, the person will be unresponsive at first but will gradually wake up in 10 to 30 minutes. The person may be sleepy, confused, or dazed. The person

  6. Epilepsy - Exams and Tests

    Making the correct diagnosis is vital to identifying the appropriate treatment to control seizures. Diagnosing epilepsy can be quite difficult. When you consult a doctor after you or your child has had unexplained seizures, you and the doctor will work to

  7. Electroencephalogram (EEG)

    An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that measures and records the electrical activity of your brain by using sensors (electrodes) attached to your head and connected by wires to a computer.

  8. Seizures - Topic Overview

    The brain controls how the body moves by sending out small electrical signals through the nerves to the muscles. Seizures, or convulsions, occur when abnormal signals from the brain change the way the body functions.

  9. Seizures - Health Tools

    Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health. Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. Epilepsy: Taking your medicines properly ...

  10. Aura and Seizures - Topic Overview

    Aura is the term used to describe symptoms that may occur before a seizure. An aura may include:Visual changes. Examples include: Bright lights.Zigzag lines.Slowly spreading spots.Distortions in the size or shape of objects.Blind or dark spots in the field of vision.Hearing voices or sounds (auditory hallucinations).Strange smells (olfactory hallucinations).Feelings of numbness or tingling on one side of your face or body.Feeling separated from your body.Anxiety or fear.Nausea.An aura is often the first sign that you are going to have a seizure. You may have an aura from several seconds up to 60 minutes before a seizure. Most people who have auras have the same type of aura every time they have a seizure.

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