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Epilepsy Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

  1. Epilepsy: Anterior Temporal Lobectomy - Topic Overview

    Anterior temporal lobectomy is the removal of part of one of the brain's temporal lobes. It is the most common type of surgery for epilepsy.Anterior temporal lobectomy is used to treat people with temporal lobe epilepsy, the most common type of epilepsy in adults, when antiepileptic medicines fail to control seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy usually causes complex partial seizures that begin in the temporal lobe.For a person who has seizures that do not get better with antiepileptic medicines, anterior temporal lobectomy may be a good option. Having surgery may help control epilepsy better than if the person were to keep trying antiepileptic medicines.1

  2. Epilepsy - Other Treatment

    For many years, antiepileptic medication was the only treatment for people with epilepsy. This is still true for many people, although surgery is now an option for some.

  3. Epilepsy: Atonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    An atonic seizure is a sudden loss of muscle tone in the muscles that hold the body and head upright.The seizure occurs without warning and usually causes the person to fall down.Some atonic seizures may be more limited, only causing the person's head to drop for a moment.Atonic seizures are fairly uncommon and occur mostly in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This is a severe form of generalized epilepsy that begins in early childhood. (Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also have tonic seizures.)People who have atonic or tonic seizures are likely to be injured when they fall. Children may have to wear helmets and restrict their activities to prevent serious injury.

  4. Tips for Parents of Children With Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    If your child has epilepsy,there are many ways to lower his or her risk of injury and avoid embarrassment sometimes caused by seizures: Use padded side rails and waterproof pads on cribs and beds. Use car seats and seat belts,and have your child wear a helmet when biking,skiing,or skating. Do not let your child swim alone. If you have a young child,do not leave him or her alone in the ...

  5. Epilepsy - Medications

    Medications to prevent epileptic seizures are called antiepileptics. The goal is to find an effective antiepileptic medication that causes the fewest side effects. Antiepileptic medications prevent seizures in 60% to 70% of people who take them. Although

  6. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    Temporal lobe epilepsy involves the portions of the brain that control emotions and memory. The temporal lobes are located on each side of the head just above the ears at the temples. Temporal lobe epilepsy can cause both partial and generalized seizures.Temporal lobe seizures cause behaviors such as smacking of the lips or rubbing the hands together. Other features of the seizures may include emotional or thought disturbances and hallucinations involving sounds, smells, or tastes.Treatment with medicine controls seizures in many people who have temporal lobe epilepsy. A type of brain surgery called anterior temporal lobectomy is another treatment option for people with this type of epilepsy.

  7. Epilepsy - Health Tools

    This health tool will help you make wise health decisions or take action regarding epilepsy.

  8. Imaging Tests for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    Imaging tests, such as MRI or CT scan, are often done after a first seizure. And they are recommended in other situations. An MRI or CT scan may be done immediately if you had a seizure along with confusion or new motor or sensory problems that did not improve soon after the seizure ended. Ongoing headache or fever, AIDS, recent head trauma, cancer, or anticoagulant therapy also increases the likelihood that the seizure was related to a serious brain problem. The nature of the seizure and your age can also help determine whether an imaging test is needed.Imaging tests may be used before epilepsy surgery to find the exact location of a problem in the brain. Because scans are able to detect brain lesions, they can also be helpful in deciding whether it is safe to stop treatment with medicine. The presence of lesions increases your risk of having seizures if you stop taking medicine.

  9. Epilepsy - Cause

    Learn about causes of epilepsy, including tumor, infection, or damage to the brain.

  10. Helping a Person During a Seizure - Topic Overview

    An epileptic seizure or convulsion can be terrifying. A seizure temporarily interferes with muscle control, movement, speech, vision, or awareness. It may cause a person's entire body to shake violently for a few seconds to a few minutes, and he or she may lose consciousness.Seizures can be mild to severe, and they affect people differently. Even though you may feel helpless around someone having

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