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Epilepsy Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

  1. Epilepsy - Home Treatment

    Controlling seizures caused by epilepsy requires a daily commitment to following your treatment plan. If you are using antiepileptic medication, you must take your medication exactly as prescribed. Not following the treatment plan is one of the main reaso

  2. Special Diets for Epilepsy

    When the body burns (metabolizes) fat, it creates substances called ketones. The ketogenic diet tries to force the body to use more fat for energy instead of sugar (glucose) by increasing fat and restricting carbohydrates. It is not yet clear how or why the ketogenic diet prevents or reduces seizures, but it has been shown to be effective in reducing epileptic seizures in some children.1The ...

  3. Epilepsy: Simple Partial Seizures - Topic Overview

    Simple partial seizures occur in children and adults with some forms of epilepsy. They are about half as common as complex partial seizures. The person stays awake and aware during the seizure. The seizure may be only a strange smell or taste, sound or visual disturbance, or feeling of confusion, anxiety, or fear—some people describe these sensations as an aura. The person's arms, face, or hands may briefly stiffen, tingle, flex, or jerk, but this does not always occur. Eyes may blink rapidly during the seizure. The person may cry out or may not be able to speak.Simple partial seizures affect only those muscles or body parts controlled by the specific area of the brain where the seizure begins. After the seizure, the person may feel weak or numb in that area of his or her body (often one side of the face, one hand, or one arm).

  4. Epilepsy: Myoclonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    Myoclonic seizures affect a small number of children and adults with generalized epilepsy of unknown cause (idiopathic). In children and teens with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, the seizures seem to occur most often after waking up or while falling asleep.During a myoclonic seizure:The arms, legs, torso, or facial muscles jerk rapidly as though they are being shocked.The body may jerk once or many times, on one or both sides of the body, in a rhythmic or random pattern.The person usually does not lose consciousness.Myoclonic seizures are almost always very brief.

  5. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy develops between ages 12 and 18. People with the disorder tend to have seizures that cause jerking in the shoulders or arms. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures and absence seizures may be present along with myoclonic seizures. Seizures often occur early in the morning.People with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy have normal intelligence and do not have other brain or nerve disorders. A family history of myoclonic seizures is present in about half of the people with the disorder. But the exact cause is unknown. Most people require lifelong treatment with medicine.

  6. Epilepsy - When To Call a Doctor

    Seizures do not always require urgent care. However, call 911 or other emergency services immediately if the person having a seizure stops breathing for longer than 30 seconds. After calling or other emergency services, begin rescue breathing.

  7. Epilepsy - Medications

    Medications to prevent epileptic seizures are called antiepileptics. The goal is to find an effective antiepileptic medication that causes the fewest side effects. Antiepileptic medications prevent seizures in 60% to 70% of people who take them. Although

  8. Stopping Medicine for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    It is easy to understand people's reasons for wanting to stop medicine. Some reasons are side effects and drug toxicity,the cost and inconvenience of medicine,and,for women who want to have children,the higher risk of birth defects associated with some epilepsy medicines. If you have not had a seizure in several years,you may want to discuss with your doctor the possibility of stopping ...

  9. Epilepsy and Driving - Topic Overview

    If you have seizures that alter your awareness, consciousness, or muscle control, you may not have the legal right to drive.Laws vary from state to state, but in many cases you have to be seizure-free for at least 6 months to 1 year before you can get a driver's license.The laws of the state you live in, not your doctor, decide whether or not you have the right to drive. You can find out about the law in your state by visiting the Epilepsy Foundation website at www.epilepsyfoundation.org/resources/drivingandtravel.cfmBefore getting a license, you may have to show proof from your doctor that you are receiving treatment and that the treatment has brought your seizures under control. (Remember, too, that some drugs used to control epilepsy may make you drowsy. If you have just started a new drug, don't drive until you know how the drug will affect you.)In general, the risk of having a seizure-related traffic accident is greatly reduced in people who have been seizure-free for 1 year.

  10. Epilepsy - What Increases Your Risk

    The risk of developing epilepsy increases if you have family history of epilepsy or a head injury with loss of consciousness or amnesia for more than 24 hours.

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