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    Epilepsy Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

    1. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      The left and right sides of the brain are called hemispheres. Hemispherectomy is the removal of one side of the brain. This procedure is sometimes done on children who have severe forms of epilepsy, such as Rasmussen syndrome and Sturge-Weber disease. These conditions badly damage one side of the brain, cause frequent seizures and problems with physical and mental development. And these conditions do not respond well to drug treatment.Hemispherectomy may completely prevent seizures and reverse delays in development that occur with some forms of epilepsy.The surgery always causes some loss of movement and sensation on one side of the body and sometimes causes partial loss of vision in half of the visual field of each eye. But most children with a large epileptic area on one side of the brain already have these problems before the surgery.

    2. Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Electroencephalography (EEG) is thought to be the most useful test in confirming a diagnosis of epilepsy, but it is not foolproof. Some people with abnormal EEG results do not have epilepsy. This is not common.About 50% of people with epilepsy will have normal results on their first EEG.1 If epilepsy is still suspected, a follow-up EEG may be done. This second test may be a sleep-deprived EEG, in which the test is done after you have been forced to stay awake for a longer period of time than usual. A sleep-deprived EEG can sometimes reveal abnormalities that did not show up on the regular EEG.From 10% to 40% of people with epilepsy will have normal EEG results even after having several EEG tests done.1Video and EEG monitoring records seizures on videotape and computer so that the doctor can see what happens just before, during, and right after a seizure occurs. The video records what you are doing while the EEG records the electrical activity occurring in your brain. This type of

    3. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Tonic seizures are fairly uncommon. They occur mostly in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This is a severe form of generalized epilepsy that begins in early childhood. (Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also have atonic seizures.)When a tonic seizure occurs, the muscles in the body contract and the entire body stiffens. This occurs suddenly and without warning. And it often causes the person to fall down.People who have tonic or atonic seizures are likely to be injured when they fall. Children may have to wear helmets and restrict their activities to prevent serious injury.

    4. Special Diets for Epilepsy

      When the body burns (metabolizes) fat, it creates substances called ketones. The ketogenic diet tries to force the body to use more fat for energy instead of sugar (glucose) by increasing fat and restricting carbohydrates. It is not yet clear how or why the ketogenic diet prevents or reduces seizures, but it has been shown to be effective in reducing epileptic seizures in some children.1The ...

    5. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - When To Call a Doctor

      Seizures do not always require urgent care. However, call 911 or other emergency services immediately if the person having a seizure stops breathing for longer than 30 seconds. After calling or other emergency services, begin rescue breathing.

    6. Epilepsy Medicine Therapy Failure - Topic Overview

      Medicine therapy for epilepsy can fail for several reasons: You do not follow the treatment plan. You have to follow your therapy routine exactly as your doctor orders,to have the best chance of keeping seizures under control. Missing a dose here or there or taking doses too close together can upset the levels of the drug in your body and lead to seizures,severe side effects,and other health ...

    7. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Cause

      Learn about causes of epilepsy, including tumor, infection, or damage to the brain.

    8. Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      An atonic seizure is a sudden loss of muscle tone in the muscles that hold the body and head upright.The seizure occurs without warning and usually causes the person to fall down.Some atonic seizures may be more limited, only causing the person's head to drop for a moment.Atonic seizures are fairly uncommon and occur mostly in people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This is a severe form of generalized epilepsy that begins in early childhood. (Children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome may also have tonic seizures.)People who have atonic or tonic seizures are likely to be injured when they fall. Children may have to wear helmets and restrict their activities to prevent serious injury.

    9. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

      Epilepsy that causes partial seizures is sometimes called focal epilepsy, because the seizures start at a specific focus or location within the brain. In people with this type of disorder, the electrical charges that cause seizures begin in a specific area in the brain, although more of the brain may become affected during the seizure.Epilepsy that causes partial seizures is the most common type of epilepsy in adults. The seizures do not always have a known cause. But they often result from severe head injury, stroke, brain tumor, brain infections, scar tissue, and other diseases that affect the brain.These same conditions may also cause partial seizures in children. But the cause of partial seizures in children is more often unknown (idiopathic). These seizures are often a form of benign focal childhood epilepsy, which has no known cause.Drug therapy is the usual treatment for partial seizures for both adults and children. Surgery that removes the affected area of the brain is also

    10. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Medications

      Medications to prevent epileptic seizures are called antiepileptics. The goal is to find an effective antiepileptic medication that causes the fewest side effects. Antiepileptic medications prevent seizures in 60% to 70% of people who take them. Although

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