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Epilepsy Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Epilepsy

  1. Helping a Person During a Seizure - Topic Overview

    An epileptic seizure or convulsion can be terrifying. A seizure temporarily interferes with muscle control, movement, speech, vision, or awareness. It may cause a person's entire body to shake violently for a few seconds to a few minutes, and he or she may lose consciousness.Seizures can be mild to severe, and they affect people differently. Even though you may feel helpless around someone having

  2. Focal Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    Epilepsy that causes partial seizures is sometimes called focal epilepsy, because the seizures start at a specific focus or location within the brain. In people with this type of disorder, the electrical charges that cause seizures begin in a specific area in the brain, although more of the brain may become affected during the seizure.Epilepsy that causes partial seizures is the most common type of epilepsy in adults. The seizures do not always have a known cause. But they often result from severe head injury, stroke, brain tumor, brain infections, scar tissue, and other diseases that affect the brain.These same conditions may also cause partial seizures in children. But the cause of partial seizures in children is more often unknown (idiopathic). These seizures are often a form of benign focal childhood epilepsy, which has no known cause.Drug therapy is the usual treatment for partial seizures for both adults and children. Surgery that removes the affected area of the brain is also

  3. Ethosuximide for Epilepsy

    Drug details for Ethosuximide for epilepsy.

  4. Questions About Medicines for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    While working with your doctor to plan a medicine routine for yourself or your child,it may help you to talk about some of the choices and issues involved. Some of the following questions might help you prepare. How often will I or my child have to take the medicine? Some medicines for epilepsy have to be taken several times a day. This is sometimes hard for children in school; people with ...

  5. Hemispherectomy for Epilepsy - Topic Overview

    The left and right sides of the brain are called hemispheres. Hemispherectomy is the removal of one side of the brain. This procedure is sometimes done on children who have severe forms of epilepsy, such as Rasmussen syndrome and Sturge-Weber disease. These conditions badly damage one side of the brain, cause frequent seizures and problems with physical and mental development. And these conditions do not respond well to drug treatment.Hemispherectomy may completely prevent seizures and reverse delays in development that occur with some forms of epilepsy.The surgery always causes some loss of movement and sensation on one side of the body and sometimes causes partial loss of vision in half of the visual field of each eye. But most children with a large epileptic area on one side of the brain already have these problems before the surgery.

  6. Phenobarbital for Epilepsy

    Drug details for Phenobarbital for epilepsy.

  7. Epilepsy: Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures - Topic Overview

    Generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizures are the easiest seizures to recognize. They happen most often in people with generalized epilepsy of unknown cause.A generalized tonic-clonic seizure begins with a sudden loss of consciousness. During the first 15 to 30 seconds of the seizure, the entire body stiffens as the muscles contract. The back and neck are arched. Sometimes the person may cry out as the vocal cords contract and air is released from the lungs. The person may turn blue because he or she isn't breathing. This is the tonic phase of the seizure.During the next 30 to 45 seconds, the muscles jerk (convulse) in a rhythmic pattern. This is the clonic phase of the seizure. While the muscles are jerking, the person may bite his or her tongue or lose bladder or bowel control.An entire seizure lasts 1 to 2 minutes. After the seizure, the person will be unresponsive at first but will gradually wake up in 10 to 30 minutes. The person may be sleepy, confused, or dazed. The person

  8. Zonisamide for Epilepsy

    Drug details for Zonisamide for epilepsy.

  9. Levetiracetam for Epilepsy

    Drug details for Levetiracetam for epilepsy.

  10. Epilepsy - What Happens

    Although epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders involving the nervous system, experts often cannot explain exactly how or why the disease develops and how or why the abnormal electrical activity in the brain occurs.

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