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Treatment for Painful Curved Penis Shows Promise

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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Barbara Bronson Gray

HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Some diseases are especially tough to discuss.

When Tony Lee realized that his penis was curving whenever he had an erection -- making it painful and difficult for him to have sex -- he had no idea what was wrong. He became depressed and very worried, and his relationship with his wife started to change.

"For a man to dread sex, it's just not natural," he said. "There were times when I would stay up late on purpose, just to make sure my wife was sleeping before I got into bed. I was just totally embarrassed."

His wife finally convinced him to see his primary care physician, who referred him to a urologist. The specialist told him he had Peyronie's disease, a connective tissue disorder involving the growth of fibrous collagen plaques in the soft tissue of the penis. The condition can cause pain, erectile dysfunction and shortening of the penis.

The diagnosis was difficult to face.

"You do freak out. It's such a personal area. It's like, 'Noooooo! Why couldn't I just lose a finger? Anything but this,'" said Lee, who is 46. Lee asked that his full name not be used.

Experts estimate Peyronie's disease, a connective tissue disorder, affects at least 5 percent of men. Although the cause of the disorder is not known, physicians think genetic predisposition and repetitive minor trauma to the penis during sexual activity may play a role. People with diabetes, and those who have had prostate cancer surgery or erectile dysfunction, are also susceptible to the disease, according to Dr. Larry Lipshultz, a professor of urology at Baylor College of Medicine.

The treatment options are very limited, and there is no cure. "There is no oral or topical medication," said Dr. Elizabeth Kavaler, a urologist at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City. "You can excise the plaque and tighten up the other side, but that reduces the length, or you can use a penile prosthesis."

Lipshultz said he's had some luck with about half of his patients when he gives them a drug called verapamil, a calcium channel blocker, which is injected into the shaft of the penis. The use of the drug is based on its ability to degrade collagen, slowing, preventing or even reversing plaque formation and the progression of Peyronie's disease, according to a 2002 study published in the International Journal of Impotence Research. A verapamil gel that is applied to the skin is also sometimes used, according to Kavaler.

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