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Macular Degeneration Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Macular Degeneration

  1. Contact Lenses and Eye Infections

    When you wear contacts, you're more likely to get eye infections, including keratitis (corneal ulcers) and pinkeye (conjunctivitis).

  2. Your Vision in Adulthood and Middle Age

    Your eyesight changes as you age. Here's what you should know about vision in adulthood and middle age.

  3. A Visit to the Eye Doctor

    WebMD explains what a routine eye exam entails, including vision tests that may be performed.

  4. Detecting Eye Diseases and Conditions

    Learn more from WebMD about common eye diseases, such as cataracts, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and more.

  5. Topic Overview

    All children Use the guidelines below to schedule routine vision checks and eye exams with your pediatrician or family doctor. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Ophthalmologists (AAO) recommend that all children have an eye exam during the newborn period and again at all routine well-child visits.1The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening (tests) to detect lazy eye (amblyopia), misaligned eyes (strabismus), and defects in visual acuity in children between the ages of 3 and 5 years.2The AAP recommends that vision screening start around age 3 and occur each year at ages 4, 5, and 6. After that, screening should occur at ages 8, 10, 12, 15, and 18.3 The AAO recommends that vision screening start around age 3 and occur each year at ages 4 and 5. After age 5, the AAO recommends screening every 1 to 2 years.4Eye exams by a specialist (an ophthalmologist or optometrist) are recommended if a child of any age has: A family history

  6. Adult Eye Exams

    Eye exams for adults can include many tests. Here's what to expect.

  7. Myths About Your Eyes and Vision

    Fact or fiction? Get the truths behind the myths about your eyes and vision.

  8. Your Eyes and Iritis

    Iritis is a painful inflammation of the iris of the eye. Learn more about its causes, symptoms, and treatment.

  9. Night Vision Problems: Halos, Blurred Vision, and Night Blindness

    WebMD helps you understand night vision problems such as halos, blurriness, and night blindness. With a doctor’s help, you can find ways to treat vision problems you have at night.

  10. Eye Twitching

    WebMD explains the causes and treatments of eye twitching.

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