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Update to FDA Alert About Stolen Insulin

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reminding the public that stolen vials of the long-acting insulin Levemir made by Novo Nordisk Inc. still may be on the market. FDA first alerted the public to the theft in June 2009.

Evidence gathered to date suggests that the stolen insulin was not stored and handled properly and may be dangerous for people to use. The agency has received multiple reports of patients who suffered an adverse event due to poor control of glucose levels after using a vial from one of the stolen lots.

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In June 2009, FDA reported that three lots of Levemir totaling 129,000 vials had been stolen in North Carolina. So far only about 2 percent of the total amount stolen has been recovered.

The agency continues to aggressively investigate this matter and is asking for the public's help in reporting any information regarding these vials to FDA's Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) by calling 800-551-3989 or by visiting the OCI Web site.

Advice for Patients

  • Check your personal supply of insulin to determine if you have Levemir insulin from one of the following lots: XZF0036; XZF0037; XZF0038. You can locate the lot number on the side of the box of insulin and also on the side of the vial.
  • Do not use your Levemir insulin if it is from one of these lots. Replace it with a vial of Levemir insulin from another lot. If you must switch to another brand of insulin for any reason, first contact your health care provider because another insulin product may require adjustments in dosing.

Always look at your insulin carefully before using it. Levemir is a clear and colorless solution.

 

For more information about topics for your health, visit the FDA Consumer Information Center (http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/default.htm).   

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