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    Insulin Reaction Treatment

    Call 911 if the person has:

    • A severe reaction
    • A seizure
    • A loss of consciousness

    • A severe reaction
    • A seizure
    • A loss of consciousness

    For a severe reaction:

    • While waiting for emergency help, inject glucagon if you are trained to do so.

    For moderate to mild symptoms:

    1. Raise Blood Sugar

    Give the person a high-sugar food such as:

    • 3 to 4 glucose tablets
    • 1/3 to 1/2 tube of glucose in gel form
    • 1/2 cup orange juice
    • 1/3 cup apple juice
    • 1/4 to 1/3 cup raisins
    • 2 large or 6 small sugar cubes in water
    • 4 oz. to 6 oz. of regular soda, not diet
    • 1 tablespoon of molasses, honey, or corn syrup
    • 5 hard candies

    2. Repeat Treatment, if Necessary

    • After 15 minutes, test blood sugar, if possible.
    • If symptoms persist or blood sugar reading is below 70 mg/dL, give another high-sugar food.
    • If the person's next meal is more than 30 minutes away, give the person a small snack, such as 1/2 sandwich, 1 oz. cheese with 4 to 6 crackers, or 1 tablespoon peanut butter with 4 to 6 crackers.

    3. When to Get Medical Help Immediately

    • If the person still doesn't feel better, go to a hospital emergency room or call 911.

    4. Follow Up

    • If you go to the hospital, doctors may give sugar intravenously.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD on February 01, 2016

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