Skip to content

First Aid & Emergencies

Font Size

Cut That Removes All Layers of Skin - Topic Overview

Cuts may slice off several layers of skin. As long as some of the layers of skin are still in place, new skin will form in the bottom of the wound and along the wound edges. The wound will heal from the bottom up.

When a cut or scrape removes all of the layers of skin (a full-thickness avulsion injury), fat and muscle may be visible. This type of wound will form new skin only on the edges of the wound and heals from the edges into the middle. The larger the wound, the longer it will take to heal, and the greater the risk of infection.

Recommended Related to First Aid

Influenza (Children)

Has a seizure  

Read the Influenza (Children) article > >

Cutting off the tip of a finger or toe are common avulsion injuries. If this avulsion injury is larger than 0.25 in. (6.5 mm) by 0.25 in. (6.5 mm), evaluation by a doctor is usually needed. If you are able to recover the piece of skin that was cut off, take it with you. It will probably not be reattached, but it will give your doctor more information about your injury.

Avulsion injuries are usually treated in one of the following ways:

  • Allowing the wound to heal on its own, growing new skin from the edges into the middle
  • Stitching the edges of the wound together, if the wound is small
  • Reattaching the avulsed skin
  • Grafting skin over the wound

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: June 06, 2012
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
    1
    Next Article:

    Cut That Removes All Layers of Skin Topics

    Today on WebMD

    Antibiotic on hand
    Slideshow
    3d scan of fractured skull
    Slideshow
     
    Father putting ointment on boy's face
    Slideshow
    Person taking food from oven
    Q&A
     
    sniffling child
    Slideshow
    wound care true or false
    Slideshow
     
    caring for wounds
    Slideshow
    Harvest mite
    Slideshow
     

    Pollen counts, treatment tips, and more.

    It's nothing to sneeze at.

    Loading ...

    Sending your email...

    This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

    Thanks!

    Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

    WebMD the app

    Get first aid information. Whenever. Wherever... with your iPhone, iPad or Android.

    Find Out More