Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

First Aid & Emergencies

Font Size

Heat After an Injury - Topic Overview

Experts disagree about the use of heat after an injury. Some experts:

  • Do not recommend using heat because it may increase swelling, especially in the first few hours right after the injury. If you decide to use heat and you notice that the swelling increases, stop using heat and return to cold treatments.
  • Think heat speeds healing. Heat applied after an injury may help restore and maintain flexibility.
    • You can use a hot water bottle, a heating pad set on low, or a damp, heated towel.
    • Do not apply heat to an injury sooner than 48 hours after the injury.
    • To avoid burning your skin, do not use anything that feels too warm.
  • Think it is best to alternate between heat and cold treatments.

If you have diabetes or have areas of chronic numbness, do not use heat unless your doctor has told you to do so. Lack of feeling in the area could cause a burn.

1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: June 27, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Heat After an Injury Topics

Today on WebMD

Antibiotic on hand
Slideshow
3d scan of fractured skull
Slideshow
 
Father putting ointment on boy's face
Slideshow
Person taking food from oven
Q&A
 
sniffling child
Slideshow
wound care true or false
Slideshow
 
caring for wounds
Slideshow
Harvest mite
Slideshow
 

WebMD the app

Get first aid information. Whenever. Wherever... with your iPhone, iPad or Android.

Find Out More