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Heatstroke Prevention: What to Wear - Topic Overview

Make good clothing choices in hot environments to help prevent heat-related illnesses. Clothing made of synthetic fabrics should be lightweight and draw sweat from the skin. The evaporation of sweat will decrease the body's temperature.

The upper body sweats more than the lower half, so wearing clothing that is loose-fitting and allows for more air circulation from the waist up is a good way to transfer heat away from the body.

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We lose 50% of our body heat from our scalp and our face. Hats used for sun protection should be designed to allow for good ventilation of the body's heat from the head.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: August 30, 2013
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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