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Object Stuck in a Child's Airway - Topic Overview

An object can become stuck in the airway at any age but is most common in children younger than age 3. Although a child may not have any symptoms when something is stuck in his or her airway, any of the following symptoms may occur:

  • Rapid, noisy, or high-pitched breathing
  • Increased drooling
  • Difficult, painful swallowing, or the complete inability to swallow
  • Gagging
  • Refusal to eat solids
  • Pain in the neck, chest, or abdomen
  • Vomiting

Since a small child may put anything in his or her mouth, it is important to be aware of what is within reach. The windpipe is about the same size as the diameter of your child's little finger. It is best to keep objects less than 1.25 in. (3.2 cm) out of a child's reach.

Recommended Related to First Aid

Guidelines for CPR and Automated External Defibrillators

Cardiac arrest, which often leads to a heart attack, is frighteningly common: every minute of every day there is another victim, according to the American Red Cross. Almost 80% of cardiac arrests occur at home and are witnessed by a family member. Would you know what to do if someone you loved experienced a cardiac emergency? Make sure you're prepared -- take a CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) class and get trained to use an automated external defibrillator, or AED. It could mean the difference...

Read the Guidelines for CPR and Automated External Defibrillators article > >

Pieces of food, such as hot dogs, peanuts, popcorn, and candy, are the most common objects that cause airway blockage, with round foods being most frequent. Small parts of a toy, the eyes sewn on a doll, or buttons from clothing can become stuck in the air passage. Latex balloons are particularly hazardous, because even a tiny piece can completely block the airway.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: June 04, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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