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How Everyday Habits Zap Energy continued...

● You're not getting enough daylight.
"Sunlight triggers your brain to release specific brain chemicals such as serotonin, which is vital to boosting mood and energy," says Northrup. So step outside every day for a 20-minute walk, but don't forgo the SPF - it's the sunlight absorbed by your eyes that activates the brain's pineal gland and signals the release of energizing neurochemicals, so protecting your skin from UV rays won't defeat the purpose.

● You obsess over everything.
"My research shows that women are prone to ruminating - we overanalyze everything, be it a friend's comment or a fight with hubby, which stresses us out and zaps our energy," explains Yale psychologist Susan Nolen-Hoeksema, Ph.D., author of Eating, Drinking, Overthinking. "It becomes a vicious cycle - stress brings on more rumination, which leaves us even more anxious and exhausted." Her suggestion: Find someone you trust to vent to for five minutes, and then let it go.

● You're glued to your cell phone or pager.
They're designed to make life easier, but these gadgets can actually increase anxiety levels by placing more demands on you throughout the day, according to a University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee study. And it's worse for women, who are more likely to receive telephone calls at work from a crying child or a frustrated spouse, says study author Noelle Chesley, Ph.D. Consider asking your family to email you rather than call (unless it's a real emergency): The study found that Internet use didn't evoke the same stress.

● You've got a lot of lingering to-do's.
Annoying recurring problems (like a constantly running toilet or a leaky sink) can be even more emotionally draining over time than a major life trauma like losing your job or a loved one or getting divorced. "A one-time stressful event can impact energy short-term, but it's all those little nagging unfinished tasks - I call them "NUTS" - that hang around that wear you out over time," explains Michael Roizen, M.D., author of You: The Owner's Manual. This low-grade chronic stress can cause your body to constantly produce stress hormones, such as cortisol, that increase blood pressure, age your arteries, and weaken your immune system, effectively aging you by about 32 years, Roizen's research shows. Who knew that simply crossing items off your to-do list could amp up your energy levels and make you feel a few decades younger?

How Hidden Health Concerns Wear You Out

● You've got sinus problems.
Patients who report unexplained chronic fatigue are nine times more likely to have sinusitis symptoms (such as headaches, sinus pressure, and chronic nasal congestion) than those who feel rested and well, according to a Georgetown University Medical Center study. "Most of the patients I diagnose with sinusitis are women in their 20s, 30s, and early 40s - and they're the most likely to brush off their symptoms as run-of-the-mill exhaustion," says study author Alexander Chester, M.D. Women are particularly susceptible during pregnancy, when shifts in hormone levels can cause nasal membranes to swell. Your doctor can generally diagnose sinusitis by taking a careful history of your symptoms. Treatment may involve nasal steroid sprays to reduce inflammation, decongestants, and antihistamines to treat underlying allergies.

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