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Runner's High: Is It for Real?

Is this feeling of euphoria the real deal? More importantly, is it enough to get you across the finish line?

More High, Less Low

While runner's high might be more short-term, it's well-known that regular exercise also offers long-term benefits, on both the mind and the body.

"On average, you tend to see people who are runners and habitual exercisers having better moods, suffering from less depression and less anxiety, and more general feelings of well-being," says Bryant. "For people who are physically active on a regular basis, they have active relaxation -- kind of by moving the body and focusing on the sensation of moving your body and getting into the rhythmic activity and motion, it produces this relaxation response, and that I think contributes significantly to the feelings of psychological well-being."

While marathon running can take its toll on the body, it does offer significant benefits as well.

"Clearly, there are many health benefits of running at this level," says Rick Hall, MS, a registered dietitian and advisory board member of the Arizona Governor's Council on Health, Physical Fitness, and Sports. "A smart marathon runner has put in many hours of training for many weeks or months, before the event, and the health benefits of sustained aerobic exercise are well documented: improved circulation, reduced body fat, lowered blood cholesterol, and better self-esteem."

Swimmer's High?

For many people, the thought of running 26.2 miles is simply out of the question. Does that mean they'll never get to experience the euphoric feeling of runner's high? Not necessarily.

"The research suggests that a wide variety of activities can produce this effect," says Bryant.

Whether it's swimming, cycling, or rowing, the key to the high is repetition.

"What these sports have in common is that they are things you can perform in a repetitive rhythmic fashion, and that seems to produce the same effect," says Bryant.

Whatever sport you choose, another piece of good news is that you don't have to push your limits to reap a reward.

"The other thing that is encouraging is that workouts don't have to be overly strenuous to produce this effect," says Bryant. "Most research has looked at running and cycling and so forth, but when you look at some of the studies that have been done in the clinical environment, the key is being active for 30 minutes or more at a moderate intensity level to see some of these beneficial psychological outcomes."

Beyond Runner's High

When a runner comes down off the high, many are left asking, "Why bother?" What sense is there in running a 26.2 mile race?

"I've completed three full marathons and two half-marathons in the past two years," Hall tells WebMD. "In the next year, I plan to complete two half-marathons and two full marathons -- one as a component of an Ironman competition."

While it sounds insane, for Hall, it's the epitome of accomplishment after months of training and hard work that drives him to compete in marathons over and over again.

"For me, the event itself isn't really about competition," says Hall. "The marathon is my reward for the months of training leading up to the event itself. You don't build a house in one day: You make a plan, wake up early every day, and work hard. Such as it is, for me, with a marathon."

And of course, there's more than runner's high -- there's finish-line high.

"There is no better feeling than raising your hands as you cross the finish line of a 26.2 mile course to the sound of hundreds of spectators cheering," says Hall. "The emotional high of completing an endurance event can last for days."

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Reviewed on October 17, 2006

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